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New Landscape Rating System to Transform The Industry, Complete Green Building Puzzle

10.11.2009
A partnership of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at The University of Texas at Austin and the U.S. Botanic Garden today released the nation’s first rating system for the design, construction and maintenance of sustainable landscapes, with or without buildings.

The Sustainable Sites Initiative led by the partners developed the rating system out of four years of work by dozens of the country’s leading sustainability experts, scientists and design professionals, as well as public input from hundreds of individuals and dozens of organizations, to create this missing link in green design. The announcement took place at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington.

“While carbon-neutral performance remains the holy grail for green buildings, sustainable landscapes move beyond a do-no-harm approach,” said Nancy Somerville, executive vice president and CEO of ASLA. “Landscapes sequester carbon, clean the air and water, increase energy efficiency, restore habitats and ultimately give back through significant economic, social and environmental benefits never fully measured until now.”

“We are facing unprecedented environmental challenges such as water scarcity and climate change that require fundamental changes in the way that we interact with the land," said Susan Rieff, executive director of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. “This voluntary rating system and guidelines cover all aspects of working with outdoor spaces of all sizes, and provide information for designing landscapes that go beyond beauty to actually improving ecosystem health and the health of communities for generations to come."

“Landscapes can give back,” said Holly H. Shimizu, executive director of the United States Botanic Garden. “We believe that as these guidelines become widely used, not only will they be as transformative to the landscape industry as LEED was to buildings, but more than that, they will allow built landscapes to be regenerative like natural landscapes, and assist in mitigating some of the most pressing environmental issues we face today. We need to acknowledge our landscapes’ value, treasure them and cultivate them sustainably and responsibly. The need is urgent, the time is now and these guidelines, when used correctly, are the tools.”

The rating system works on a 250-point scale, with levels of achievement for obtaining 40, 50, 60 or 80 percent of available points, recognized with one through four stars, respectively. If prerequisites are met, points are awarded through the 51 credits covering areas such as the use of greenfields, brownfields or greyfields; materials; soils and vegetation; construction and maintenance. These credits can apply to projects ranging from corporate campuses, transportation corridors, public parks and single-family residences. The rating system is part of two new reports issued from the Initiative, “The Case for Sustainable Landscapes and Guidelines” and “Performance Benchmarks 2009,” both available for download at www.sustainablesites.org.

To test the rating system, the Sustainable Sites Initiative opened a call for pilot projects in conjunction with the release of the rating system. Any type of designed landscape is eligible, so long as the project size is at least 2,000 square feet. The call will remain open until Feb. 15, 2010, and the initiative will work with and oversee the projects during the two-year process. More information about the pilot projects is available at www.sustainablesites.org/pilot.

About the Sustainable Sites Initiative
The Sustainable Sites Initiative is an interdisciplinary partnership led by the American Society of Landscape Architects, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at The University of Texas at Austin and the United States Botanic Garden to transform land development and management practices with the nation’s first voluntary rating system for sustainable landscapes, with our without buildings. For more information, visit www.sustainablesites.org.
Saralee Tiede 512-232-0104, or stiede@wildflower.org;
Jim Lapides 202-216-2371or jlapides@asla.org;
Sally Bourrie 202-226-4145 or sbourrie@aoc.gov

Saralee Tiede | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.wildflower.org
http://www.sustainablesites.org

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