Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Charcoal Studied for Landfill Methane Containment

16.03.2012
Methane, often used for cooking and heating, is a potent greenhouse gas -- more than 20 times more effective at trapping atmospheric heat than carbon dioxide. A major source of slow methane leaks is old, abandoned landfills and town dumps.

While containing gas at these sites can be expensive, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers believe an effective and cheap way to trap it may be as easy as laying down a covering using charcoal as the key ingredient.

UIC civil and materials engineering professor Krishna Reddy and earth and environmental sciences research professor Jean Bogner think layers of biochar, either by itself or mixed with soil, can trap and hold on to escaping methane long enough for methanotropic bacteria to break it up, producing less-harmful carbon dioxide as a byproduct.

"Our concept is to design a cheap and effective cover system," said Reddy, who has done extensive research on landfill management solutions. "We've done preliminary studies on biochar and found it has the characteristic of being able to adsorb methane."

Biochar is charcoal made from biomass, such as wood and crop waste. It is basically carbon with high surface areas where bacteria cling, waiting to trap and consume any passing methane gas. Most methane escapes from old dumps or landfills before the bacteria can do its work. Biochar helps hold the gas in place.

Reddy and Bogner received a $350,000 research grant from the National Science Foundation to test biochar for use on landfills. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates there are at least 10,000 old or abandoned dumps and landfills around the country that could use an inexpensive containment cover to trap slow leaks of methane.

Reddy and Bogner will do lab analysis of biochar made from different sources, testing for ability to hold moisture, acidity levels, and ash content. They will determine which charcoals work best at containing methane, how well it works in soil mixes, and what thickness is needed to be effective.

Reddy said another advantage of biochar is that it helps oxygenate soil, providing an environment where methanotropic bacteria can flourish. It is a cheap, sustainable product that can be made from crop waste in a pyrolysis unit on site at a landfill. The process also produces a bio-gas or oil byproduct that can be used for fuel.

"Our lab data will be fed into a mathematical model that we'll use to scale up systems," Reddy said. "We'll do field testing to validate the model." The UIC project will take about three years.

"We want our model to serve as a design tool," Reddy said. "Every landfill site is different, but we hope our model can be used to analyze site-specific conditions to design an effective cover system."

"It's relatively cheap and it's a simple operation. We hope landfill operators and government regulators will like it," he said.

The NSF grant will support one undergraduate and two graduate student research assistants. Reddy also plans to discuss his research in graduate-level seminars, and in talks to government regulators and to middle- and high-school science teachers.

Paul Francuch | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.uic.edu

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Successful calculation of human and natural influence on cloud formation
04.11.2016 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

nachricht Invasive Insects Cost the World Billions Per Year
04.10.2016 | University of Adelaide

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Speed data for the brain’s navigation system

06.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

What happens in the cell nucleus after fertilization

06.12.2016 | Life Sciences

IHP presents the fastest silicon-based transistor in the world

05.12.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>