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Siemens introduces point-of-use advanced oxidation system for TOC reduction in semiconductor applications

Siemens has introduced an effective method for removing total organic carbon (TOC) in point-of-use (POU) ultrapure water treatment systems for semiconductor applications.

This proprietary advanced oxidation process, referred to as the VANOX POU system, will consistently reduce TOC to 0.5 parts per billion (ppb) and can treat seasonal TOC variations in feed water. This is important, since TOC elevations above 1.0 ppb can directly affect the manufacturing process, significantly impacting product yields.

Advanced oxidation produces hydroxyl radicals that attack and break down difficult organic compounds measured as TOC. Although advanced oxidation has been used in industrial applications for years, it had not been refined enough to minimize key contaminants and thus improve various tool applications. The Siemens VANOX POU system has made improvements in the reactor design, allowing reductions in power and capital costs and reductions in chemical use.

“The Siemens VANOX POU system creates a more effective radical for TOC reduction compared to common AOP processes,” said Bruce Coulter, Ultrapure Water Technical Manager for the Microelectronics Group at Siemens Water Technologies, “and it effectively removes troublesome organics such as urea, 2-propanol (IPA) and Trihalomethanes (THMs) found in semiconductor waters.”

The VANOX POU system will also deliver critical control temperature, low trace metal contaminates and reduce particles to less than 100 units per liter at .05 microns. The current industry standard for POU particle reduction is 200 to 500 units per liter.

VANOX is a trademark of Siemens and its affiliates in some countries.

Contact USA:
Karole Colangelo
Corporate Public Relations Manager
Siemens Water Technologies Corp.
2501 N. Barrington Road
Hoffman Estates, IL 60192
847-713-8458 phone
847-713-8469 fax
847-687-9630 cell
E-mail address
The Siemens Industry Sector (Erlangen, Germany) is the world's leading supplier of production, transportation, building and lighting technologies. With integrated automation technologies as well as comprehensive industry-specific solutions, Siemens increases the productivity, efficiency and flexibility of its customers in the fields of industry and infrastructure. The Sector consists of six Divisions: Building Technologies, Drive Technologies, Industry Automation, Industry Solutions, Mobility and Osram. With around 222,000 employees worldwide Siemens Industry posted in fiscal year 2008 a profit of EUR3.86 billion with revenues totaling EUR38 billion.

With the business activities of Siemens VAI Metals Technologies, (Linz, Austria), Siemens Water Technologies (Warrendale, Pa., U.S.A.), and Industrial Technologies, (Erlangen, Germany), the Siemens Industry Solutions Division (Erlangen, Germany) is one of the world's leading solution and service providers for industrial and infrastructure facilities. Using its own products, systems and process technologies, Industry Solutions develops and builds plants for end customers, commissions them and provides support during their entire life cycle. With around 31,000 employees worldwide Siemens Industry Solutions achieved an order intake of EUR 8.415 billon in fiscal year 2008.

Dr. Rainer Schulze | Siemens Industry
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