Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists reconstruct Greenland’s climate history with the help of Antarctic ice cores

26.10.2011
A distance of around 14,000 kilometres separates Greenland from Antarctica.

Nevertheless, using climate data from Antarctic ice cores, an international team of researchers succeeded in reconstructing a curve for Greenland temperature changes that goes back 800,000 years into the past, thus enabling completely new insights into the climate history of Greenland and the North Atlantic.


Ice core from Dome C (Concordia)
Photo: S. Kipfstuhl, Alfred Wegener Institute

The results have been published in the scientific journal Science under the title “800,000 Years of Abrupt Climate Variability”.

The experts used the so-called “seesaw” model of ocean circulation as the basis for their investigations and calculations. This model implies that warm phases in the northern part of the Atlantic Ocean are accompanied by cooling in the south – and vice versa.

“During the last ice age there were abrupt swings in climate on Greenland. They led to temperature fluctuations of up to ten degrees Celsius within a few decades. These jumps were caused by changes in the intensity of the Atlantic overturning circulation that transports heat to high northern latitudes. If this heat pump was suddenly boosted, a more pronounced redistribution of heat from the southern ocean to the North Atlantic took place,” says co-author Dr. Gregor Knorr from the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association. The researchers therefore assumed in their theoretical considerations that indications of these rapid climate changes had to exist both in Greenland and in Antarctica.

Today scientists are gaining information on what temperatures prevailed in the two regions at that time from ice cores. These cores are taken from ice sheets and are considered as one of the most informative climate archives because of their fine temporal resolution. The ice sheets are created when snow falls on the top layer, is compacted there and forms a new ice layer in the course of time. This layer then not only contains air bubbles and trace gases from that time, but also archives the water isotope composition of the precipitation, with the help of which scientists can look far back into the history of the climate. “The longest cores from the Greenland ice sheet date back to the last interglacial, i.e. about 120,000 years ago. The ice archive of the Antarctic, by contrast, encompasses the past 800,000 years,” states Knorr.

In the first step the researchers compared temperature data from Greenland and Antarctic ice cores of the last 100,000 years. The Greenland core was retrieved from the center of the ice cap. Scientists took the Antarctic cores at so-called Dome C on the East Antarctic plateau in 2004.

Both ice cores confirmed the theoretical assumptions of the scientists for this period. “The data from the first 100,000 years matched each other so convincingly that we decided to look back even further into the past,” reports Knorr. On the basis of the actual existing data from the Antarctic, the researchers then calculated an “synthetic” temperature time series for Greenland that goes back as far as 800,000 years.

They subsequently compared the development of these data to climate data from caves in the central Chinese province of Hubei. “Today we know that during the particularly cold phases in the North Atlantic the atmospheric circulation changed so markedly that the summer monsoon in China was weaker. These precipitation patterns are still found nowadays in the stalagmites that grow in these caves and whose climate archive goes back as far as 400,000 years,” says Knorr.

The synthetic temperature curve for Greenland not only passed the cave comparison test. It additionally permits us to draw the conclusion that the rapid climate swings on Greenland during the last ice age were not exceptional cases. They apparently occurred in every ice age in the climate history of the last 800,000 years. “With our synthetic time series we can show that sudden climate changes in the course of the last 800,000 years were evidently an integral part of ice ages and of the period when they came to an end. This is a result that definitely gives grounds to conduct further research since rapid climate changes are thus possibly not only a passive parallel phenomenon, but may also have played an active role in the final stages of the ice ages,” says Knorr. These new findings could help us better understand how the transition from an ice age to a subsequent interglacial takes place. Up to now this transitional phase has baffled scientists.

First of all, however, the researchers want to find out now what special processes initiate and steer these climate swings. In addition, they face the task of simulating these phenomena with climate models and identifying the determining mechanisms. “The synthetic temperature curve for Greenland could additionally serve as a good comparative framework for future research into abrupt climate changes,” says Knorr. With the help of this curve it should be a easier for scientists to refine age of other ice and sediment samples.

Notes for Editors: The complete literature reference for the Science article is:

Barker, S. and Knorr, Gregor and Edwards, R. L. and Parrenin, F. and Putnam, A. E. and Skinner, L. C. and Wolff, E. and Ziegler, Martin (2011): 800,000 Years of Abrupt Climate Variability. Science 21 October 2011: Vol. 334 no. 6054 pp. 347-351 doi: 10.1126/science.1203580

You will find printable pictures in the online version of this press release at http://www.awi.de. Dr. Gregor Knorr is available for interviews (tel: +49 (0)471 4831-1769). Your contact in the Communication and Media Department of the Alfred Wegener Institute is Sina Löschke (tel.: +49 (0)471 4831-2008; e-mail: Sina.Loeschke@awi.de).

The Alfred Wegener Institute conducts research in the Arctic, Antarctic and oceans of the high and middle latitudes. It coordinates polar research in Germany and provides major infrastructure to the international scientific community, such as the research icebreaker Polarstern and stations in the Arctic and Antarctica. The Alfred Wegener Institute is one of the seventeen research centres of the Helmholtz Association, the largest scientific organisation in Germany.

Ralf Röchert | idw
Further information:
http://www.awi.de

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht NASA sees quick development of Hurricane Dora
27.06.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht Collapse of the European ice sheet caused chaos
27.06.2017 | CAGE - Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Climate and Environment

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Touch Displays WAY-AX and WAY-DX by WayCon

27.06.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Drones that drive

27.06.2017 | Information Technology

Ultra-compact phase modulators based on graphene plasmons

27.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>