Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

NASA Sees Genevieve Cross International Date Line as a Super-Typhoon

08.08.2014

Tropical Storm Genevieve had ups and downs in the Eastern Pacific and Central Pacific over the last week but once the storm crossed the International Dateline in the Pacific, it rapidly intensified into a Super Typhoon. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured of the storm.


This visible image of Super-Typhoon Genevieve was taken from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite on Aug. 7 at 1:34 UTC.

Image Credit: NASA/NOAA

When Suomi NPP flew over Genevieve on August 7 at 01:48 UTC the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard captured an infrared image of the storm.  VIIRS collects visible and infrared imagery and global observations of land, atmosphere, cryosphere and oceans. VIIRS flies aboard the Suomi NPP satellite, which is managed by both NASA and NOAA.

The VIIRS image showed a symmetrical storm with a clear eye, about 15 nautical miles (17.2 miles/27.7 km) wide, surrounded by powerful thunderstorms.

... more about:
»JTWC »Line »NASA »NPP »Space »Suomi »Super-Typhoon »UTC »VIIRS »Visible »knots »satellite »thunderstorms »winds

On August 7 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) Super-Typhoon Genevieve's maximum sustained winds were near 140 knots (161.1 mph/259.3 kph). Genevieve is a Category 5 typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Genevieve was located near latitude 15.6 north and longitude 178.1 west, approximately 692 nautical miles (796 miles/1,282 km) west of Johnston Island. 

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted "Genevieve has rapidly intensified over the past 24 hours." The storm's maximum sustained winds have increased by 75 knots (126.6 mph/ 138.9 kph), pushing the storm from 65 knots (74.3 mph/120.4 kph) to 140 knots (161.1 mph/259.3 kph).

When NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over Genevieve, data showed that there was a band of thunderstorms over the southern quadrant of the storm some 60 nautical miles (69 miles/111 km) thick.

The JTWC forecast calls for Genevieve to intensify with a peak of 145 knots (166.9 mph/268.5 kph) later on August 7. The forecast calls for Genevieve to maintain super typhoon strength over the next day and a half as it turns from a west-northwesterly track to a more northerly track over open ocean.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro / Max Gleber
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Rob Gutro | Eurek Alert!

Further reports about: JTWC Line NASA NPP Space Suomi Super-Typhoon UTC VIIRS Visible knots satellite thunderstorms winds

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Laser from a plane discovers Roman goldmines in Spain
21.11.2014 | FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

nachricht Mediterranean meteorological tide has increased by over a millimetre a year since 1989
21.11.2014 | FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Regional economic cooperation in Central Asia

21.11.2014 | Event News

Educating the Ecucators

13.11.2014 | Event News

36th Annual IATUL Conference 2015: Call for papers and posters

12.11.2014 | Event News

 
Latest News

Laser from a plane discovers Roman goldmines in Spain

21.11.2014 | Earth Sciences

Darwin 2.0

21.11.2014 | Life Sciences

Siemens Receives Power Island Order with H-class Turbine Technology in Ohio, U.S.A.

21.11.2014 | Press release

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>