Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Infrared NASA Imagery Shows Sinking Air, Elongation in Tropical Storm Emang

16.01.2013
The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument that flies on NASA's Aqua satellite provides valuable data to tropical cyclone forecasters, and revealed sinking air, a small area of powerful thunderstorms, and a slightly elongated Tropical Storm Emang.

Infrared data on Tropical Storm Emang's cloud top temperatures was captured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on Jan. 15 at 0823 UTC (3:23 a.m. EST). AIRS data showed that the largest area of powerful thunderstorms were in the northern half of the storm. That area showed cold cloud top temperatures of -63F (-52C) indicating high, powerful thunderstorms where the heaviest rain was falling.


NASA infrared data on Tropical Storm Emang captured by NASA's Aqua satellite on Jan. 15 at 0823 UTC (3:23 a.m. EST) showed that the largest area of powerful thunderstorms (purple) were in the northern half of the storm. That are is where heaviest rain was falling. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

The AIRS data also showed that sinking air or subsidence was occurring in the southwestern quadrant of the storm, which is weakening the convection there.

AIRS data also showed that the low level center of circulation had become slightly elongated, stretching from southwest to northeast. For a tropical cyclone to intensify, its circulation centers from the surface to upper atmosphere basically have to stack up. When the center becomes elongated the storm usually has a difficult time intensifying.

On Jan. 15 at 0900 UTC, Tropical Storm Emang's maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots (40.2 mph/64.8 kph). Emang is moving slowly to the south-southwest at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph). Emang was centered near 13.5 south latitude and 78.6 east longitude, about 525 nautical miles (604.2 miles/ 972.3 km) southeast of Diego Garcia. Diego Garcia is a coral atoll in the central southern Indian Ocean.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect atmospheric conditions to improve over the coming days, so that Emang can organize and strengthen. Fortunately, the storm is no threat to land.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Rob Gutro | EurekAlert!

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht NASA sees the Tropical Cyclone Glenda away from land
27.02.2015 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht Africa, From a CATS Point of View
27.02.2015 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

European Geosciences Union meeting: programme online, provisional press conference topics

26.02.2015 | Event News

Round Table on Solar Energy Research

18.02.2015 | Event News

40th FEBS Congress 2015 – The Biochemical Basis of Life

09.02.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Africa, From a CATS Point of View

27.02.2015 | Earth Sciences

NASA sees the Tropical Cyclone Glenda away from land

27.02.2015 | Earth Sciences

'Ecosystem services' help assess ocean energy development

27.02.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>