Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Geophysicists uncover new evidence for an alternative style of plate tectonics

29.11.2017

Canadian-Turkish collaboration reveals an event of active 'drip' tectonics

When renowned University of Toronto (U of T) geophysicist J. Tuzo Wilson cemented concepts in the emerging field of plate tectonics in the 1960s, he revolutionized the study of Earth's physical characteristics and behaviours. Decades later, successor researchers at U of T and Istanbul Technical University have determined that a series of volcanoes and a mountain plateau across central Turkey formed not solely by the collision of tectonic plates, but instead by a massive drip and then detachment of the lower tectonic plate beneath Earth's surface.


Cave city in volcanic rocks of uplifted Central Anatolian plateau.

Credit: Russell Pysklywec

The researchers propose that the reason the Central Anatolian (Turkish) Plateau has risen by as much as one kilometre over the past 10 million years is because the planet's crust and upper mantle - the lithosphere - has thickened and dripped below the region. As the lithosphere sank into the lower mantle, it first formed a basin at the surface, which later sprang up when the weight below broke off and sank further into the deeper depths of the mantle.

"It seems the heavy base of the tectonic plate has 'dripped' off into the mantle, leaving a massive gap in the plate beneath Central Anatolia. Essentially, by dropping this dense lithospheric anchor, there has been an upward bobbing of the entire land mass across hundreds of kilometres," said Professor Oğuz H. Göğüş of the Eurasia Institute of Earth Sciences at Istanbul Technical University (ITU), lead author of a study reporting the findings published in Nature Communications this month.

It's a new idea where plate shortening initially squeezed and folded a mountain belt, triggering the thickening and dripping of the deep lithosphere, and then increasing the elevation of most of central Turkey. Puzzled by the presence of such a process at a significant distance away from regular plate tectonic boundaries, the research team set about identifying why, in an area of high heating and high elevation, is the lithosphere below completely gone - something that was recently discovered from seismology.

They tested high-performance computational models against known geological and geophysical observations of the Central Anatolian Plateau, and demonstrated that a drip of lithospheric material below the surface can account for the measured elevation changes across the region.

"It's a new variation on the fundamental concepts of plate tectonics," said Professor Russell Pysklywec, chair of the Department of Earth Sciences at U of T and one of the study's coauthors. "It gives us some insight into the connection between the slow circulation of near-solid rock in Earth's mantle caused by convection currents carrying heat upwards from the planet's interior, and observed active plate tectonics at the surface.

"This is part of the holy grail of plate tectonics - linking the two processes to understand how the crust responds to the mantle thermal engine of the planet."

Pysklywec carried out the study with Göğüş, who received his PhD from U of T in 2010, and fellow researchers at ITU including Professor A. M. C. Şengör, and Erkan Gün of the Eurasia Institute of Earth Sciences at Istanbul Technical Institute. Gün is also now a current graduate student at U of T, supervised by Pysklywec. The research adds to decades of groundbreaking work in plate tectonics at U of T, and builds on Wilson's seminal work.

"Tuzo Wilson is a towering figure in geophysics internationally and the person most responsible for pioneering the ideas of plate tectonics in the 1960s," said Pysklywec. "I am pleased that we are continuing his legacy in geophysics with our work."

While Pysklywec notes there are many locations on Earth missing its lithosphere below, he is quick to reassure that no place is in imminent danger of sinking into the mantle or boosting upwards overnight. "Our results show that the Central Anatolian Plateau rose over a period of millions of years. We're talking about mantle fluid motions and uplift at the pace at which fingernails grow."

Göğüş highlights the links of the tectonics with human history saying, "The findings are exciting also because of the link with the remarkable historical human activity of Central Anatolia where some of the earliest known civilizations have existed. For example, Central Anatolia is described as an elevated, dry, cold plain of Lycaonia in Strabo's Geographika in 7 BC, and even cave paintings in the region dating to approximately 7000 BC record active volcanic eruptions on the plateau."

###

The study, titled "Drip Tectonics and the enigmatic uplift of the Central Anatolian Plateau", was published November 16 in Nature Communications. The research was made possible with support from the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), Istanbul Technical University, and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Russell Pysklywec
Department of Earth Sciences
University of Toronto
416-978-3021 (W)
416-537-2683 (M)
russ@es.utoronto.ca

Oğuz Göğüş
Eurasian Institute of Earth Sciences
Istanbul Technical University
goguso@itu.edu.tr

Sean Bettam
Communications, Faculty of Arts & Science
University of Toronto
416-946-7950
s.bettam@utoronto.ca

http://www.utoronto.ca 

Sean Bettam | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: lithosphere mantle plate tectonics tectonic plate

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Texas A&M-Galveston team finds cave organisms living off methane gas
29.11.2017 | Texas A&M University

nachricht Dark ocean bacteria discovered to play large role in carbon capture
28.11.2017 | Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum internet goes hybrid

In a recent study, published in Nature, ICFO researchers Nicolas Maring, Pau Farrera, Dr. Kutlu Kutluer, Dr. Margherita Mazzera, and Dr. Georg Heinze led by ICREA Prof. Hugues de Riedmatten, have achieved an elementary "hybrid" quantum network link and demonstrated for the first time photonic quantum communication between two very distinct quantum nodes placed in different laboratories, using a single photon as information carrier.

Today, quantum information networks are ramping up to become a disruptive technology that will provide radically new capabilities for information processing...

Im Focus: New proton record: Researchers measure magnetic moment with greatest possible precision

High-precision measurement of the g-factor eleven times more precise than before / Results indicate a strong similarity between protons and antiprotons

The magnetic moment of an individual proton is inconceivably small, but can still be quantified. The basis for undertaking this measurement was laid over ten...

Im Focus: Frictional Heat Powers Hydrothermal Activity on Enceladus

Computer simulation shows how the icy moon heats water in a porous rock core

Heat from the friction of rocks caused by tidal forces could be the “engine” for the hydrothermal activity on Saturn's moon Enceladus. This presupposes that...

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microwave-based test method can help keep 3-D chip designers' eyes open

29.11.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists reveal rules for making ribs

29.11.2017 | Life Sciences

Geophysicists uncover new evidence for an alternative style of plate tectonics

29.11.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>