Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

ESA fostering the next generation of Earth scientists

20.11.2008
ESA has launched a new initiative – the Changing Earth Science Network – to support young scientists undertaking leading-edge research activities aimed at advancing our understanding of the Earth System.

Although the Earth has undergone significant changes in the past, there is mounting evidence that the changes imposed, mostly by human activity, during the last 150 years cannot be compared with any previous change.

Realising the importance of further understanding our planet and how it may react to these recent changes, ESA drafted a new science strategy for Earth Observation (EO) in 2006 titled 'The Changing Earth'.

The strategy, drafted in collaboration with the scientific community, outlines the 25 major scientific challenges faced today in which EO may provide key contributions to better understand the interacting components of the Earth System – including water, atmosphere and land.

The new Changing Earth Science Network initiative will allow young postdoctoral researchers to address these scientific challenges by maximising the use of EO satellite data from ESA and its Third Party Missions.

The initiative will support young scientists starting their career in the area of Earth Science for a period of two years to undertake innovative research projects specifically addressing these key scientific challenges. By providing this opportunity, ESA will support the next generation of Earth scientists to enhance our knowledge of the Earth System while maximising the scientific return of ESA EO data.

The initiative aims to foster the development of a highly dynamic network of young scientist in Europe with a good knowledge of the Agency and its EO programmes. To this end, selected candidates will have the option to carry out part of their research in an ESA centre as a visiting scientist.

The first call for proposals will be issued today. From the proposals received, ESA will select up to 10 postdoctoral scientists from the Agency’s Member States that put forward innovative research projects where ESA data may contribute to better understanding our planet.

The deadline for the proposal submission is 16 January 2009. Selections will be announced in early 2009.

Incorporating the scientific community

Since their advent, satellite missions have become central to monitoring and learning about how the Earth works, resulting in significant progress in a broad range of scientific areas.

In the mid-1990s, ESA set up its Living Planet Programme and began working in close cooperation with the scientific community to define, develop and operate focused satellite missions.

Based on the 25 major scientific challenges identified in 2006, ESA is now reinforcing this strategy. In 2008, the Support to Science Element (STSE) was launched to provide support to future and on-going missions by taking a proactive role in the formulation of new mission concepts and providing multi-mission support to science.

The Changing Earth Science Network was developed as one of the main programmatic components of STSE. To learn more about this research opportunity, please visit www.esa.int/stse.

Mariangela D'Acunto | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM11Z4DHNF_index_0.html
http://www.esa.int/stse

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Supercomputing helps researchers understand Earth's interior
23.05.2017 | University of Illinois College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

nachricht How is climate change affecting fauna in the Arctic?
22.05.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>