Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

EU funds research project on intestinal immune processes

17.01.2014
HZI researcher receives ERC Starting Grant

How do bacteria, the intestinal surface and the immune system interact with each other?

Dr Till Strowig from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig wants to tackle this question in a joint project with the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf. Using the body’s own molecule Interleukin 22, he will analyse this complex interplay.

The European Research Council ERC will support the project for the next five years with an ERC Starting Grant of 1.5 million Euro in total. The researchers hope to gain new insights regarding the development of colon cancer and other chronic intestinal illnesses.

The human colon offers an ideal habitat for a variety of bacteria. The number and composition of microbe species differ significantly from one person to the next. This individual microbiome is influenced by factors such as diet and activity of the immune system, but also by the intake of certain drugs, like antibiotics. It significantly affects the function of the intestinal mucosa and its immune responses.

The messenger Interleukin 22 and its antagonist, the Interleukin 22-binding protein, are crucial when it comes to immune reactions and tissue regeneration, as for example in wound healing. Mice which cannot produce Interleukin 22 or its antagonist exhibit a significantly higher colon cancer risk compared to animals producing these proteins.

“We want to find out how these two factors are regulated,” says Till Strowig. “Our main interest is to identify the bacteria in the intestinal flora and the cells of the immune system which are involved.” Whereas he will mainly investigate the interplay between colon bacteria and epithelium, his colleague, Prof Samuel Huber from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, will focus on the relation between immune cells and epithelium. A better understanding of the different cell types responsible for tissue regeneration and immune responses could lead to the development of new therapies against chronic intestinal illnesses and colon cancer.

Till Strowig completed the Medical Biotechnology programme at the “Technische Universität” Berlin. He wrote his diploma thesis at the Rockefeller University in New York, where he later finished his PhD, funded by the Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation. Afterwards, Strowig continued his research at Yale University. Since June 2013, he is head of the junior research group Microbial Immune Regulation at the HZI.

The ERC Starting Grant is awarded annually by the European Research Council to outstanding talents from all scientific fields (http://erc.europa.eu/starting-grants). The main criterion for ERC funding is scientific excellence of the proposed research.

The “Microbial Immune Regulation” Junior Research Group investigates the functions of the microbiome and how it affects the development of infectious diseases.

The Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research
Scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Braunschweig, Germany, are engaged in the study of different mechanisms of infection and of the body’s response to infection. Helping to improve the scientific community’s understanding of a given bacterium’s or virus’ pathogenicity is key to developing effective new treatments and vaccines.

http://www.helmholtz-hzi.de

Weitere Informationen:
EU funds research project on intestinal immune processes
Dr. Ulrike Lampe Presse- und Öffentlichkeitsarbeit
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung
HZI researcher receives ERC Starting Grant
How do bacteria, the intestinal surface and the immune system interact with each other? Dr Till Strowig from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig wants to tackle this question in a joint project with the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf. Using the body’s own molecule Interleukin 22, he will analyse this complex interplay. The European Research Council ERC will support the project for the next five years with an ERC Starting Grant of 1.5 million Euro in total. The researchers hope to gain new insights regarding the development of colon cancer and other chronic intestinal illnesses.

The human colon offers an ideal habitat for a variety of bacteria. The number and composition of microbe species differ significantly from one person to the next. This individual microbiome is influenced by factors such as diet and activity of the immune system, but also by the intake of certain drugs, like antibiotics. It significantly affects the function of the intestinal mucosa and its immune responses.

The messenger Interleukin 22 and its antagonist, the Interleukin 22-binding protein, are crucial when it comes to immune reactions and tissue regeneration, as for example in wound healing. Mice which cannot produce Interleukin 22 or its antagonist exhibit a significantly higher colon cancer risk compared to animals producing these proteins.

“We want to find out how these two factors are regulated,” says Till Strowig. “Our main interest is to identify the bacteria in the intestinal flora and the cells of the immune system which are involved.” Whereas he will mainly investigate the interplay between colon bacteria and epithelium, his colleague, Prof Samuel Huber from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, will focus on the relation between immune cells and epithelium. A better understanding of the different cell types responsible for tissue regeneration and immune responses could lead to the development of new therapies against chronic intestinal illnesses and colon cancer.

Till Strowig completed the Medical Biotechnology programme at the “Technische Universität” Berlin. He wrote his diploma thesis at the Rockefeller University in New York, where he later finished his PhD, funded by the Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation. Afterwards, Strowig continued his research at Yale University. Since June 2013, he is head of the junior research group Microbial Immune Regulation at the HZI.

The ERC Starting Grant is awarded annually by the European Research Council to outstanding talents from all scientific fields (http://erc.europa.eu/starting-grants). The main criterion for ERC funding is scientific excellence of the proposed research.

The “Microbial Immune Regulation” Junior Research Group investigates the functions of the microbiome and how it affects the development of infectious diseases.

The Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research
Scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Braunschweig, Germany, are engaged in the study of different mechanisms of infection and of the body’s response to infection. Helping to improve the scientific community’s understanding of a given bacterium’s or virus’ pathogenicity is key to developing effective new treatments and vaccines.

http://www.helmholtz-hzi.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.helmholtz-hzi.de/en/news_events/news/view/article/complete/
eu_funds_research_project_on_intestinal_immune_processes/
- This press release on www.helmholtz-hzi.de

Dr. Ulrike Lampe | Helmholtz-Zentrum
Further information:
http://www.helmholtz-hzi.de

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Lasagni awarded with Materials Science and Technology Prize 2017
09.10.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS

nachricht Eduard Arzt receives highest award from German Materials Society
21.09.2017 | INM - Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien gGmbH

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>