Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mission: city of the future

11.03.2015

German national platform lays out strategic research and innovation agenda: Science Year 2015 is devoted to the city of the future. On February 19, Fraunhofer IAO joined representatives of communities, science, industry and the general public in Berlin to present recommendations for how we can sustainably develop our cities and equip them for the future. As part of a campaign tackling the major questions around the city of the future, Fraunhofer IAO is also informing city authorities, companies and individuals and helping them find the answers.

Welcome to the city of the future – carbon-neutral, energy- and resource-efficient, livable and social. Almost two years ago, the German government worked with 34 stakeholders from communities, science and industry – including Fraunhofer IAO – to launch the National City of the Future platform (NPZ) to turn this vision into reality. The platform comes under the umbrella of the German government’s high-tech strategy and is designed to further systematic discussion on this topic across all disciplines.

Seven items on the research and innovation agenda

Science Year 2015 – City of the Future is up and running. On February 19, 2015 in Berlin, NPZ members presented Prof. Johanna Wanka, Germany’s Federal Minister of Education and Research, with a strategic research and innovation agenda for the carbon-neutral, energy-efficient, climate-adapted and social city of the future.

Compiling the agenda was a collaborative effort that was coordinated by Fraunhofer IAO, Fraunhofer IBP and the German Institute of Urban Affairs (Difu). NPZ has set seven priority areas of innovation that outline the challenges, requirements and structural measures involved in the closely interlinked social, spatial and technological facets of the city of the future. You can download the NPZ agenda fromwww.nationale-plattform-zukunftsstadt.de (German only).

A campaign designed to inform, connect and support

Fraunhofer IAO is addressing major aspects of the seven innovation areas a part of campaign running in parallel to the Science Year 2015 – City of the Future: Fraunhofer’s Morgenstadt initiative will be on board the “MS Wissenschaft” exhibition ship, giving visitors a fun way to discover a wide range of research projects concerning the city of the future.

And experts at Fraunhofer IAO and its cooperation partner the Institute of Human Factors and Technology Management (IAT) at the University of Stuttgart are starting a blog series about the city of the future, in which they present their insights, ideas and questions related to the following priority topics:

• Versatile city: Cities will have to be incredibly resilient and able to adapt to cope with the effects of climate change, shifting demographics and digitization. What are the success factors that pave the way to a “resilient” city?

• Livable city: More and more of us are living in increasingly complex urban systems. How can we embrace the idea of the city as a collaborative and social space, and how can we then design new ways of getting involved?

• Productive city: In the city of the future, production centers will be so quiet and clean that they can be located right next to residential areas. Which work practices, processes and technologies do we need to turn this vision into reality?

• Social city: Sharing is the new having. Establishing a “shareconomy” provides people and companies with new, sustainable opportunities and business models for how they use goods and resources. What do smart services look like in the city of the future, and what new living models can we expect to see?

• Moving city: More and more people and goods are on the move in our cities – leading to traffic jams, air pollution and noise. New technologies and connectivity options are making urban mobility hassle free. What do pioneering transportation concepts look like?

• Digital city: Connectivity in the Internet of Things is not only about people, but increasingly also about machines and our environment. What specific opportunities and risks does this development pose in an urban setting?

At the beginning of Science Year 2015, Fraunhofer IAO Director Prof. Wilhelm Bauer said: “As the lead institute in Fraunhofer’s Morgenstadt initiative, we want this campaign to connect the relevant players, to support companies and of course inform the public.”

Fraunhofer’s international “Future Cities” convention will take place in Berlin on November 25 and 26. It will provide an overview of the latest research as well as ideas and visions for the city of the future. The event is also a chance to meet and exchange ideas with a host of national and international players from research, politics and industry connected with this topic and to collaborate in shaping the future.

Contact:

Steffen Braun
Urban Systems Engineering
Fraunhofer IAO
Nobelstraße 12
70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Phone +49 711 970-2022
E-Mail steffen.braun@iao.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.nationale-plattform-zukunftsstadt.de
http://www.morgenstadt.de
http://blog.iao.fraunhofer.de/tag/stadt-der-zukunft/

Juliane Segedi | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

More articles from Architecture and Construction:

nachricht Smart homes will “LISTEN” to your voice
17.01.2017 | EML European Media Laboratory GmbH

nachricht Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes
16.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE

All articles from Architecture and Construction >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

Im Focus: Bacterial Pac Man molecule snaps at sugar

Many pathogens use certain sugar compounds from their host to help conceal themselves against the immune system. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now, in cooperation with researchers at the University of York in the United Kingdom, analyzed the dynamics of a bacterial molecule that is involved in this process. They demonstrate that the protein grabs onto the sugar molecule with a Pac Man-like chewing motion and holds it until it can be used. Their results could help design therapeutics that could make the protein poorer at grabbing and holding and hence compromise the pathogen in the host. The study has now been published in “Biophysical Journal”.

The cells of the mouth, nose and intestinal mucosa produce large quantities of a chemical called sialic acid. Many bacteria possess a special transport system...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Water - as the underlying driver of the Earth’s carbon cycle

17.01.2017 | Earth Sciences

Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

17.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Smart homes will “LISTEN” to your voice

17.01.2017 | Architecture and Construction

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>