Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers to fight killer slugs

10.06.2005


If you see men crawling around in the neighbour’s garden at dusk wearing headlights, it may well be that they are researchers hunting for Spanish slugs.



Spanish slugs were previously seen as a garden nuisance, but now they have started to become a serious problem also for commercial horticulture, affecting strawberries and cabbage. A glaring example is garden owners in Hordaland county, who has had up to hundred thousand slugs in their garden, while a lot of strawberry and cabbage crops were lost various places along the western coast.

The Research Council of Norway has recently awarded funding for four years to a project for mapping the spread of Spanish slugs, also known as killer slugs, Iberian slugs or Arion lusitanicus in Latin. They will study the biology of these slugs and try various methods to get rid of the annoying snails.


Therefore the researchers will be the busiest in well-kept villa gardens and in berry- and vegetable farming. They will crawl around with headlamps at dusk and in the dark, they will weigh, count and register Spanish slugs and also other slug species.

For the moment researchers do not know enough about the biology and living habits of the Spanish slug in Norway, even such fundamental aspects as life cycle, wintering and spread must be researched on much more.

In the first year of the project we will mostly do basic research and this can give us a much better understanding of how this species live in relation to factors in the environment, and consequently, how we can fight against it.

It is also important to increase our knowledge of which species of plants the slug prefers and which ones it avoids.

It is urgent to find efficient measures. Clear indications of crossing between Spanish slugs and black slugs have been found, just like in Sweden. Some have feared that such a crossbreeding can develop into a kind of superslug.

The brown slug, as the Spanish slug got to be called by “the people”, was first observed in Norway in 1988. It can be found naturally in many countries, but it creates a problem in Switzerland, Austria, Germany, parts of Poland, parts of the Netherlands and Belgium, and in Scandinavia without Iceland and the Faeroe Islands.

The natural enemies of the Spanish slug are investigated in many countries. A few methods have been observed and tested in a scientific way, these include both insects, animals and different slug agents. The Norwegian project on Spanish slugs has cooperation partners in several European regions, among other places in Sweden, Scotland and England.

Torstein Solhøy | alfa
Further information:
http://www.uib.no/info/english/

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Researchers discover a new link to fight billion-dollar threat to soybean production
14.02.2017 | University of Missouri-Columbia

nachricht Important to maintain a diversity of habitats in the sea
14.02.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'

23.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field

23.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>