Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Crop rotation may help wait out soil pathogen deadly to pumpkins

11.05.2004


Chemicals have limited effects on controlling it and there are no known resistant varieties of processing pumpkin to withstand an attack of the deadly blight known as Phytophthora capsici (P. capsici). Now, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign suspect that rotating crops that are not susceptible to the disease may be a solution to the problem.



In a recent study, 45 species of crop and weed plants were screened for their susceptibility to P. capsici. Although 22 crop species succumbed to the disease, 14 did not.

Mohammad Babadoost, a plant pathologist in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, believes that rotating the 14 resistant vegetable varieties may serve to wait out the pathogen until it is safe to once again plant pumpkins or other crops susceptible to P. capsici.


"Crop rotation is already being used by pumpkin growers as an important component of disease management," Babadoost said. "Most pumpkin growers in Illinois follow at least a short-term crop rotation. However, most growers have experienced heavy losses when carrot, lima beans, pea, pepper, snap bean, and tomato were grown prior to pumpkin."

In order to make crop rotation a successful solution to waiting out the pathogen, a critical question remains to be answered: How long does the pathogen stay alive in the soil?

"Unfortunately, we don’t know how long," Babadoost said. "Currently, I have a graduate student investigating that. We are trying to work out the problem piece by piece, then develop effective strategies to manage this disease. Definitely, the study that [Donglan] Tian completed provided us with very valuable information in dealing with this destructive pathogen."

Soybean, corn, and wheat, the major crops grown in Illinois, did not become infected, and there is no report indicating that these crops are hosts of P. capsici. The other 11 vegetable crops that, when inoculated with P. capsici, did not develop symptoms of the disease are basil, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, chive, dill, kale, kohlrabi, mustard and parsley.

The 22 vegetable crop seedlings that became infected and developed symptoms of the disease in the study are: beet, carrot, eggplant, green bean, lima bean, radish, snow pea, spinach, Swiss-chard, tomato, turnip, onion, pepper and a long list of vine vegetables including pumpkin, cantaloupe, cucumber, gourd, honeydew melon, muskmelon, squash, watermelon and zucchini.

The incidence of fruit rot on pumpkins caused by P.capsici has dramatically increased in Illinois, causing yield losses of up to 100 percent. "Jack-o-lantern pumpkin is an important crop in Illinois, and approximately 90 percent of the commercial processing pumpkin produced in the United States are grown in Illinois," Babadoost said. "So this is an economic problem for the state."

Babadoost and Donglan Tian, a graduate student in crop sciences, completed the study, which appears in the May issue of Plant Disease, a journal of the American Phytopathological Society. The research was supported in part by funds from North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture, Research and Education, the Illinois Department of Agriculture and Nestle Food Inc.

Debra Levey Larson | UIUC
Further information:
http://www.uiuc.edu/

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht New 3-D model predicts best planting practices for farmers
26.06.2017 | Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

nachricht Fighting a destructive crop disease with mathematics
21.06.2017 | University of Cambridge

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>