Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Project Targets Organic Poultry

21.11.2008
A team from several institutions led by University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture food and poultry scientists has been awarded a three-year grant for nearly $600,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Integrated Food Safety Initiative grant to do food safety research in natural and organic poultry.

Organic food is all the rage, but despite popular opinion it’s not automatically safer than conventionally grown foods. A team from several institutions led by University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture food and poultry scientists has been awarded a three-year grant for nearly $600,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Integrated Food Safety Initiative grant to do food safety research in natural and organic poultry.

Steven Ricke, a professor in the UA Food Science Department and the Center for Excellence in Poultry Science, serves as the project leader with Phil Crandall, a professor in Food Science, and Frank Jones, associate director for Extension in Poultry Science.

The term “organic” is strictly defined by the USDA National Organic Program to include poultry raised with no antibiotics, fed 100 percent organic feed and given access to outdoors. The USDA definition for “natural” for meat and poultry products specifies no artificial ingredients or added color and only minimal processing. However, the market for “natural” is rapidly changing, and this definition is being updated. USDA has also proposed voluntary standards for “naturally-raised” livestock to be raised without antibiotics and not fed animal by-products.

Organic poultry currently accounts for no more than 2 percent of the total poultry market, but it is the largest share of the organic meat market and is growing by leaps and bounds. Between 1997 and 2003, sales of organic broilers increased from about 38,000 to 6.3 million birds.

The meteoric rise in popularity of organic poultry has prompted a need for a comprehensive study of how to ensure its safety, Ricke said.

Organic and natural poultry are currently produced and processed in smaller facilities than is conventional poultry. “However, small production is usually not integrated, providing less opportunity for the control of product quality, including food safety, as in large-scale, integrated production,” Ricke said. “Almost no university research has focused on small-scale poultry production systems or their food safety issues,” said Ricke, who also holds the Wray Endowed Chair in Food Safety and serves as director of the UA Center for Food Safety.

Ricke and his team leaders will coordinate 13 research specialists on four teams from the U of A, Texas A&M University, West Virginia University, Cornell University, Purdue University and along with Dr. Anne Fanatico of the National Center for Appropriate Technology.

“Each team consists of faculty who can address the complex nature of the problems associated with food safety in organic and natural poultry,” Ricke said. “Our Extension specialists have existing close relationships with growers and processors statewide and nationally, as well as food safety education and communication specialists who can address the complex issues to the grower, processor, consumer and retail industries.”

Among the expected results of the project is a plan to write guidelines for Good Agricultural Practices – a recognized collection of principles for production and processing – for food safety on natural and organic poultry farms. The guidelines will focus on developing plans that are relevant to plants of particular sizes. Ricke said a set of Good Agricultural Practices will play a critical role in ensuring safety.

“Because natural and organic poultry production does not use antibiotics or other medications, Good Agricultural Practices are even more important,” Ricke explained.

The project will also include meetings and workshops with industry personnel. That will include a local one-day workshop on natural and organic poultry production focusing on food safety and bird health.

“The impact of completing this grant is huge as it has the potential to reach large- and small-scale producers, processors, policymakers and stakeholders who need assistance in food safety management,” Ricke said.

Steven C. Ricke | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.uark.edu

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht New gene for atrazine resistance identified in waterhemp
24.02.2017 | University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

nachricht Researchers discover a new link to fight billion-dollar threat to soybean production
14.02.2017 | University of Missouri-Columbia

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>