Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

MSU Researchers Find Rice Seed Treatments Effective, Worth Investment

18.02.2014
When every extra expense makes a difference in profitability, farmers often wonder which management decisions are worth the extra cost.

One recent example is the development of seeds treated with insecticides to discourage early damage by crop pests. Researchers at Mississippi State University have been evaluating the effectiveness of rice seed treatments to find out what producers can expect from the extra investment. Their research saves farmers time and money while helping them make informed decisions about managing their fields.


(Photo by Delta Research and Extension Center/Jeff Gore)

The rice water weevil, such as this adult on a rice leaf, is one of the most troublesome insect pests in rice, but seed treatments have proven to be effective in controlling them. The scars on the leaf are evidence of the rice water weevils’ feeding.

After testing scores of samples taken from rice fields across the state, MSU scientists found that seed treatments are effective in managing the crop’s most troublesome insect pests.

“In Mississippi, we’ve been evaluating seed treatments for about five years,” said Jeff Gore, entomologist with the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station and MSU Extension Service. “Our research has shown that rice grown with a seed treatment typically yields from 8 to 12 bushels more per acre than untreated rice. The main reason for that yield increase is rice water weevil control.”

Gore said seed treatments are effective in both conventional rice varieties and hybrids.

“Although they do not provide 100 percent control of rice water weevil, seed treatments do provide significant benefits in rice,” he said. “Because control is not absolute, a foliar insecticide application may be necessary to maximize control in some situations.”

Insect management …

Gore works at the Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville. He said researchers take core samples about 4 inches in diameter and 8 inches deep from farms across the Delta, wash them and count the rice water weevil larvae.

“An infestation of one larva per core will result in about a 1 percent yield loss,” Gore said. “Typical infestations in the Delta range from 10 to 25 weevils per core in untreated fields, resulting in a 10 to 25 percent yield loss.”

Gore said that seed treatments provide other benefits to rice producers, too.

“Seed treatments provide good control against a whole complex of other rice pests,” he said. “Seed treatments help manage chinch bugs, grape colapsis, thrips and soil insects, such as wire worms and white grubs, and get the plants off to a good, healthy start.”

Performance under flood …

Seed treatments for row crops, such as corn, cotton or soybean, target early-season pests that are in the soil when the seed is planted. But rice seed treatments are different.

“We’re targeting primarily rice water weevils, and they only move into the field when producers establish the permanent flood about three to six weeks after planting,” Gore said. “So seed treatments for rice have to last longer than in other crops, because they are sitting in the field a lot longer.”

Gore said all of the seed treatments are water soluble, and water can have both positive and negative effects on seed treatments.

“Because rice is grown in aquatic or semi-aquatic environments, we needed to find out how different water management practices might impact the seed treatments’ performance,” he said.

Andrew Adams, an MSU graduate student from Greenville, set up tests in grower fields across the Delta and at the Delta Research and Extension Center.

“To determine the impact of a delayed flood, we looked at flood timings of six and eight weeks after planting, which is about two months that the seed treatment was sitting in the soil without having insect pressure,” Adams said. “Where we delayed the permanent flood until eight weeks after planting, the seed treatment was not compromised and no yield losses were observed.”

Flushing fields …

Adams also looked at the impact of flushing fields. Flushing a field is a form of irrigation where the field is brought to a shallow flood and then drained.

“Flushing is used for herbicide incorporation, seed germination or for irrigation during hot and dry conditions,” he said.

Adams tested zero, one and two flushes with water across a rice field to check the efficacy of three different seed treatments.

“We found that zero and one flush had no negative impact,” he said. “The seed treatments Cruiser and NipsIt were negatively impacted with the application of the second flush and yield losses were observed. However, Dermacor wasn’t negatively impacted by the application of the second flush.”

Seed treatment rates …

Gore and Adams also tested the efficacy of seed treatment rates in hybrid rice.

“Hybrid rice varieties are grown at 20 to 25 pounds of seed per acre, versus 75 to 85 pounds with conventional varieties,” Gore said. “Because seed treatment rates are based on a per-seed basis, we wanted to know if the lower seeding rate, and hence the lower seed treatment rate on a per acre basis, impacted insect control. It did not.”

No additional benefit was observed from increasing the seed treatment rate. Currently labeled rates for hybrid rice production are correct, Gore said.

“The management practice that showed significant improvement in rice water weevil control beyond the seed treatment was a foliar overspray with a pyrethroid on hybrid rice,” Gore said.

Dr. Jeff Gore | Newswise
Further information:
http://www.msstate.edu

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Sequencing of barley genome achieves new milestone
26.08.2015 | University of California - Riverside

nachricht Entomologists sniff out new stink bug to help soybean farmers control damage
25.08.2015 | Texas A&M AgriLife Communications

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: OU astrophysicist and collaborators find supermassive black holes in quasar nearest Earth

A University of Oklahoma astrophysicist and his Chinese collaborator have found two supermassive black holes in Markarian 231, the nearest quasar to Earth, using observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

The discovery of two supermassive black holes--one larger one and a second, smaller one--are evidence of a binary black hole and suggests that supermassive...

Im Focus: What would a tsunami in the Mediterranean look like?

A team of European researchers have developed a model to simulate the impact of tsunamis generated by earthquakes and applied it to the Eastern Mediterranean. The results show how tsunami waves could hit and inundate coastal areas in southern Italy and Greece. The study is published today (27 August) in Ocean Science, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU).

Though not as frequent as in the Pacific and Indian oceans, tsunamis also occur in the Mediterranean, mainly due to earthquakes generated when the African...

Im Focus: Self-healing landscape: landslides after earthquake

In mountainous regions earthquakes often cause strong landslides, which can be exacerbated by heavy rain. However, after an initial increase, the frequency of these mass wasting events, often enormous and dangerous, declines, in fact independently of meteorological events and aftershocks.

These new findings are presented by a German-Franco-Japanese team of geoscientists in the current issue of the journal Geology, under the lead of the GFZ...

Im Focus: FIC Proteins Send Bacteria Into Hibernation

Bacteria do not cease to amaze us with their survival strategies. A research team from the University of Basel's Biozentrum has now discovered how bacteria enter a sleep mode using a so-called FIC toxin. In the current issue of “Cell Reports”, the scientists describe the mechanism of action and also explain why their discovery provides new insights into the evolution of pathogens.

For many poisons there are antidotes which neutralize their toxic effect. Toxin-antitoxin systems in bacteria work in a similar manner: As long as a cell...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer IPA develops prototype of intelligent care cart

It comes when called, bringing care utensils with it and recording how they are used: Fraunhofer IPA is developing an intelligent care cart that provides care staff with physical and informational support in their day-to-day work. The scientists at Fraunhofer IPA have now completed a first prototype. In doing so, they are continuing in their efforts to improve working conditions in the care sector and are developing solutions designed to address the challenges of demographic change.

Technical assistance systems can improve the difficult working conditions in residential nursing homes and hospitals by helping the staff in their work and...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Networking conference in Heidelberg for outstanding mathematicians and computer scientists

20.08.2015 | Event News

Scientists meet in Münster for the world’s largest Chitin und Chitosan Conference

20.08.2015 | Event News

Large agribusiness management strategies

19.08.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Interstellar seeds could create oases of life

28.08.2015 | Physics and Astronomy

An ounce of prevention: Research advances on 'scourge' of transplant wards

28.08.2015 | Health and Medicine

Fish Oil-Diet Benefits May be Mediated by Gut Microbes

28.08.2015 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>