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Tiles from eggshells?

Soon folks, we will be walking and running on eggshells, so do not throw them away.

Five scientists, Rassimi Abdul Ghani, Mohd Hanafiah Abidin, Ahmad Zafir Romli, Mohd Hariz Kamarudin, Zaleha Afandi and Muhamad Faizal Abd Halim of the Institute Of Science, Uitm, Malaysia are turning one of the world’s oldest waste into useful flooring materials. They made tiles from eggshells.

Naming the tiles EPoSTi, they made composite tiles by combining polymers and chicken eggshells, an innovation from domestic waste. Explaining their work in an expo, the use of eggshells in micro size will increase the rigidity and stiffness of the composite, making it a suitable flooring material. This is due to the nature of eggshells which can be used as rigid particulate fillers of the tiles. The combination offers excellent impact resistance, as it is able to withstand force applied to it. In short, it is durable.

EPoSTi is also suitable for underwater flooring. It is also durable as when tested in labs, they were found to be stable when subjected to thermal testing. The eggshells by nature can withstand temperatures of up to 750 Degrees Celcius, thus it passed the thermal testing easily. This feature guarantees safety against high temperature thus can be practical in hot climate countries.

Another benefit of EPoSTi is that it is suitable for any decorating purposes, as it can be designed according to one's taste. It fulfils almost all specifications for flooring materials and offers another alternative in house decor at an affordable price. The tiles can be sold cheaper.

Another thing, inventing tiles from eggshells, otherwise seen as waste, can reduce headache of clogged drains, waste treatment, odour emission, thus cleaner environment have we.

Eggshell is a by-product which contains about 94% of calcium carbonate by weight which is easily obtained due to heavy consumption of egg in food industry. For example China, the world number one egg producer, has boosted output 67.8% over the past decades, thus a rich source of potential natural filler for EPoSTi. A good news for the tiles industry.


Megawati Omar | Research asia research news
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