Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Research Team Develops Single-Crystal Pump for Miniaturized DNA Forensics

17.10.2012
A Boise State University research team has developed a new type of micro pump that can be used in forensic DNA profiling. Their results are being published in the journal Smart Materials and Structures this month.

“The pump represents a giant leap in miniaturization,” said biology professor Greg Hampikian, who leads the team along with materials science professor Peter Müllner.

In the race for rapid DNA profiling, a large impediment has been that pump technology has not been miniaturized the way that chemical and electronic components have. The team set a goal three years ago to develop a miniature pump that had no mechanical parts, no electrical contacts and would be compatible with existing DNA profiling kits. The micro pump can be used in a “lab on a chip” to help streamline DNA gathering and testing procedures.

“Magnetic Shape Memory (MSM) technology introduces a new paradigm in engineering by replacing gears, belts and whistles with just materials that change shape,” Müllner said. “With MSM technology we can make entire machines with just two or three pieces. The material is the machine.”

The pump features a MSM crystal as its primary component. The material used to create it was invented by Kari Ullakko, a former Boise State faculty member who now works at Lappeenranta University of Technology in Savonlinna, Finland. In addition to the three researchers, Boise State students Laura Wendel and Aaron Smith also are authors on the most recent research findings.

Two State of Idaho Higher Education Research Council (HERC) grants helped fund the research for the micro pump. Its successful development has led to several university patent applications and has attracted the attention of industry.

Müllner is an expert in MSM technology and Boise State is home to one of the most productive Materials Science and Engineering programs in the Pacific Northwest. The university will host the International MSM conference in Boise on June 3-7, 2013. Learn more at http://www.icfsma.com/.

Hampikian is the volunteer director for the Idaho Innocence Project and an internationally recognized expert in DNA forensics. He played a high-profile role in the exoneration last October of Amanda Knox, the American student tried and convicted of killing her roommate in 2007 while living and studying in Perugia, Italy. Hampikian regularly trains police officers, attorneys, coroners and crime lab technicians in forensic DNA analysis.

Sherry Squires | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.boisestate.edu

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Using a simple, scalable method, a material that can be used as a sensor is developed
15.02.2017 | University of the Basque Country

nachricht New mechanical metamaterials can block symmetry of motion, findings suggest
14.02.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>