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Electronics sector progresses with breakthroughs in materials science

09.07.2003


Technical Insights Electronics and Semiconductors Industry Impact Research Service: Developments and Opportunities in Advanced Electronic Materials



Materials such as polymers, superconducting ceramics, and diamond films are likely to shape the electronics industry in the coming decade. Processing technologies for these improved materials will also gain importance.

"Advanced materials are synthesized at nano levels, creating the possibility of achieving several new structures and properties, which will enable an endless number of electronic applications," states Technical Insights Analyst Sathyaraj Radhakrishnan.


Nanostructures based on inorganic and organic semiconductors, coupled with complex materials such as polymers will form the building blocks for many future devices and systems.

"Researchers will need capital-intensive, large-scale instrumentation to characterize, synthesize, and process new materials from their smallest constituents and at all scales of assembly," says Radhakrishnan.

Electronics sector advances will depend on the ability to assess life cycle costs, which include materials costs, and overcome stringent management policies and limited investment funding.

Performance optimization, miniaturization, and integration of different classes of materials into multifunctional components are also becoming essential as advanced electronic materials are finding a prominent place in many applications.

Researchers are working on an array of new technologies including elaboration and characterization of very thin dielectrics for gate control, enabling reliance on fewer electron memories, lithographic techniques, and optical interconnects.

Many research frontiers such as synthesis of semi-conducting organic materials, optical conductivity of doped conjugated polymers, holographic data storage, plastic displays, and ferroelectric ceramics are also evolving.

"Multidisciplinary international collaboration is essential to make progress as challenges persist in the form of a choice of substrates, control of dopants, growth techniques to identify native defects, and quantum fluctuations," concludes Radhakrishnan.

New analysis by Technical Insights, a business unit of Frost & Sullivan (www.Technical-Insights.frost.com), Electronics and Semiconductors Industry Impact Research Service: Developments and Opportunities in Advanced Electronic Materials, highlights the remarkable advancements made in this unique and exciting area of research, which will have far-reaching industrial, economic, and societal impact. The analysis also provides valuable information on major market participants, key patents, and various obstacles to commercialization.

Technical Insights will hold a conference call at 1 p.m. (EDT)/ 10 a.m. (PDT) on July 15, 2003 to provide a summary and analysis of the latest developments in advanced electronic materials. Those interested in participating in the call are requested to send e-mail to Julia Paulson at jpaulson@frost.com with the following information for registration:

Full name, Company Name, Title, Contact Tel Number, Contact Fax Number, E-mail. Upon receipt of the above information, a confirmation/pass code for the live briefing will be e-mailed to you.


Frost & Sullivan is a global leader in strategic market consulting and training. Acquired by Frost & Sullivan, Technical Insights is an international technology analysis business that produces a variety of technical news alerts, newsletters, and reports. The ongoing analysis on advanced electronic technologies is covered in Microelectronics Alert, a Technical Insights subscription service. Executive summaries and interviews are available to the press.

Electronics and Semiconductors Industry Impact Research Service: Developments and Opportunities in Advanced Electronic Materials
Report D250

Contact:
USA:
Julia Paulson
P: 210-247-3870
F: 210-348-1003
E: jpaulson@frost.com

APAC:
Pramila Gurtoo
DID: 603-6204-5811
Gen: 603-6204-5800
Fax: 603-6201-7402
E: pgurtoo@frost.com

Julia Paulson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ti.frost.com/
http://www.frost.com
http://www.Technical-Insights.frost.com

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