Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Noise reduction leads to more comfort

18.05.2012
New test methods to investigate acoustic and aeroacoustic properties of textile materials

The extent to which a textile material has a sound-absorbing effect and which are the noises that cause wind flow, can now be investigated using acoustic test apparatus at the Hohenstein Institute in Bönnigheim.


The new acoustic test shows how much noise the human ear registers despite sound-absorbing textiles. ©Fotolia

Hohenstein scientists in the team working with Dr. Jan Beringer, in conjunction with Hochschule Reutlingen and Rökona Textilwerk GmbH in Tübingen, have developed innovative test methods to investigate the acoustic and aeroacoustic properties of textile materials.

Noise now pervades all parts of our everyday lives and is becoming an increasing source of stress. In addition to the negative effects on the nervous system, studies have shown that it diminishes concentration ability by about 20-30 percent, reduces work performance, increases accident risks and above all decreases feelings of comfort. Even sounds above 40 decibels corresponding approximately to soft radio music can produce these negative effects.

Therefore sound-absorbing textile materials are gaining popularity in the many sectors where sounds are perceived as unpleasant and disruptive. It is primarily in the interior design and automotive sectors where specifically adapted materials are used to minimise and optimise noises leading to a rise in acoustic comfort.

For instance, sound-absorbing ceilings, partitions, floors and furniture surfaces in public facilities, open-plan offices and exhibition halls as well as technical textiles in vehicle interior linings are all effective measures to counter acoustic disturbances.

During the testing process at the Hohenstein Institute different textile materials are investigated with the acoustic measuring device. The fabric to be tested is clamped in a sample holder between a loud speaker and a measuring microphone. One great benefit here is the small sample size as fabric samples measuring only 10 x 10 cm are large enough. Measurements are taken within a frequency spectrum of 200 – 20,000 Hz to ascertain the extent (decibels) to which the fabric attenuates/dampens the signal sent by the loudspeaker.

The aeroacoustic test determines the frequency spectra of the often disturbing background noise of textile air flow. The Hohenstein Institute test apparatus is able to investigate virtually all samples ranging from small laboratory samples up to complete components and can simulate wind speeds of up to 140 km/h.

The textile or component is exposed to air flow and a special measurement microphone is then used to record the noise caused by the air flow. This noise is then subject to computer analysis and the corresponding frequencies of the noise are determined. These resulting comparative figures then enable materials to be optimised for the most diverse of uses.

As well as capturing the aeroacoustic properties of textile fabrics, locally-triggered causes of air flow noises can also be determined. This knowledge can then be used to optimise textile s and components even more.

Contacts:
Hohenstein Institute
Dr. Jan Beringer
j.beringer@hohenstein.de

Andrea Höra | idw
Further information:
http://www.hohenstein.de/en/inline/pressrelease_12362.xhtml

Further reports about: Hohenstein Noise negative effects textile materials wind speed

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht New biomaterial could replace plastic laminates, greatly reduce pollution
21.09.2017 | Penn State

nachricht Stopping problem ice -- by cracking it
21.09.2017 | Norwegian University of Science and Technology

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>