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Latest Low-Corrosion and Low-Wear DuPont™ Kalrez® and Vespel® High-Performance Parts for Aerospace Applications

05.07.2013
At the Paris Air Show 2013, June 17th to 23rd, DuPont performance Polymers highlighted two new high performance products for aerospace applications.

DuPont™ Kalrez® AeroSeal™ 7800 perfluoroelastomer parts help minimizing corrosion of titanium and stainless steel for longer part life. DuPont™ Vespel® ASB-0670 parts for fan blade wear strips provide significantly longer wear life versus incumbent coatings.


Photo: DuPont

DuPont™ Kalrez® and Vespel® high performance parts are used in demanding aerospace and aircraft engines.

DuPont™ Kalrez® and DuPont™ Vespel® high performance parts have provided innovative solutions to complex aerospace sealing, wear and friction challenges at high temperatures for over 45 years. Kalrez® perfluoroelastomer parts are used as oil seals in turbine and jet engines and air delivery systems. Vespel® parts offer very high temperature capability, wear resistance, and low friction to effectively replace metallic materials.

“DuPont tests with Kalrez® AeroSeal™ 7800 parts demonstrate low corrosion in titanium and steel for 1000 hours @ 250 °C with excellent compression set resistance, and offer a maximum service temperature of 325 °C”, says Mark Schmeckpeper, global aerospace marketing manager DuPont™ Kalrez® and Vespel®. And he continues: “Our equally new Vespel® ASB-0670 parts perform in very demanding conditions. They can be found in blade wear strips, where friction and load create high stress. They provide improved wear resistance and a low coefficient of friction compared to other polyimides over a wide range of temperatures. In DuPont wear tests, that have been confirmed by customer tests, Vespel® ASB-0670 parts have shown exceptional performance.”

Polyimides Improve Wear Resistance, Reduce Weight

Vespel® SCP parts, which debuted at Paris Air Show in 2011, provide improved wear resistance at elevated temperatures and a low coefficient of friction compared to earlier polyimides. In applications where non-metallic materials have never been widely used, engineers are relying on the high-temperature capabilities and wear resistance of Vespel® SCP parts to replace metal, thus saving weight and improving fuel effiency. “SCP parts are a key reason why we’re gaining more and more approvals for use in aircraft systems in wear applications, including bumpers, wear pads, bushings, seals and shrouds,” said Schmeckpeper. Vespel® SCP parts typically weigh 75 to 80 percent less than stainless steel and substantially less than aluminum or titanium components.

DuPont™ Kalrez® and Vespel® high-performance parts provide innovative solutions to aerospace designers and specifiers when complex sealing, wear or friction difficulties are encountered.

To learn more about Vespel® in aerospace/aircraft visit www.vespel.dupont.com.
To learn more about Kalrez® parts in aersospace/aircraft visit www.kalrez.dupont.com.
„Together, we can fly farther, faster, longer and safer“
From aircraft to the Mars Rover, from support equipment to operations, DuPont provides a wide range of products and solutions such as lighter weight materials and safer ways to operate to meet the unique needs of the industry. Keeping with the slogan „Together, we can fly farther, faster, longer and safer“ DuPont showcased at the Paris Air Show a selection of its key products and latest solutions that can help the aerospace industry meet the need for reduced weight and increased engine efficiency.
To learn more visit DuPont Aircraft/Aerospace.
DuPont Performance Polymers is committed to working with customers throughout the world to develop new products, components and systems that help reduce dependence on fossil fuels and protect people and the environment. With more than 40 manufacturing, development and research centers throughout the world, DuPont Performance Polymers uses the industry’s broadest portfolio of plastics, elastomers, renewably sourced polymers, filaments and high-performance parts and shapes to deliver cost-effective solutions to customers in aerospace, automotive, consumer, electrical, electronic, industrial, sporting goods and other diversified industries.

DuPont (NYSE: DD) has been bringing world-class science and engineering to the global marketplace in the form of innovative products, materials, and services since 1802. The company believes that by collaborating with customers, governments, NGOs, and thought leaders we can help find solutions to such global challenges as providing enough healthy food for people everywhere, decreasing dependence on fossil fuels, and protecting life and the environment. For additional information about DuPont and its commitment to inclusive innovation, please visit www.dupont.com.

The DuPont Oval Logo, DuPont, The miracles of science and all product names denoted with ® are trademarks or registered trademarks of E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company or its affiliates.

PP-EU-2013-14

Editorial Contact:
Nicole Savioz
Tel: +41 22 717 4042
Fax + 41 22 580 27 91
nicole.savioz@dupont.com

Nicole Savioz | DuPont
Further information:
http://www.dupont.kalrez.com
http://www.dupont.com

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