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Autopilot to Taiwan: ITRI is Offering Prototyping Prize for Connected Vehicles

Having identified enormous developmental potential in the trending topic of connected vehicles, Taiwan's Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) is looking for forward-thinking prototypes in the 2012 European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC). Eight finalists will be invited to the institute's research campus in Taiwan to present their pilot projects. The winner and finalists will receive cash prizes ranging from EUR 1,000 to EUR 10,000.

Intelligent cars made possible by modern navigation and communication technologies are a popular topic with automotive manufacturers and customers alike. Automated parking functions and systems that warn drivers of braking vehicles and sharp curves are just the beginning.

Following its major success in 2011, ITRI is offering a prototyping prize in the field of connected vehicles for the second time in this year's ESNC. The institute's stated objective - "Connect Autos Tightly to ICT from V2X" - reflects its search for innovative solutions that combine modern satellite navigation and smart vehicle communication technologies.

ITRI will invite eight finalists to demonstrate their prototypes at its research campus in Taiwan and take advantage of the extensive testing facilities available there. ITRI and its more than 5,800 employees constitute Taiwan's leading research institute for technological progress.

Its campus is based on a leading worldwide network for information and communication technology (ICT) - which includes the European Chamber of Commerce in Taipei, the Taiwan Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers Association (TEEMA), and various national universities - also supporting ITRI's sponsorship of the ESNC prototyping prize. In addition, the institute works closely with renowned partners such as the Fraunhofer Institutes, Siemens, Volkswagen, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, and Intel - to name just a few.

As an incubation centre for Taiwan's industry, ITRI has also produced more than 162 spinoff companies. The prototyping prize winner and finalists will receive cash prizes ranging from EUR 1,000 to EUR 10,000.

DLR's "Cooperative Road Damage Evasion Application" wins 2011 prize
Last year's winner of the ITRI prototyping prize came from the southeast German state of Bavaria. Taking home the EUR 10,000 were Fabian de Ponte Müller and his team from the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) Oberpfaffenhofen (near Munich) with their prototype of an application for "cooperative road damage evasion". With it, a vehicle equipped with sensory, positioning, and communication functions can identify potholes when driving over them and transmit the exact location to other drivers in the area, enabling them to avoid the damage. "The invitation to ITRI's impressive research campus turned out to be a fantastic experience. We made some new contacts who provided us with valuable insights for the ongoing development of our prototype," Fabian de Ponte Müller recalls.

Ideas for this year's ITRI prototype prize can be submitted until 30 June 2012 at

About the Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI)
Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) is Taiwan's largest and one of the world's leading high-tech R&D institutions. Founded in 1973, ITRI has nurtured more than 70 CEOs, 171 innovative companies, and accumulated more than 16,000 patents. ITRI has offices in the United States, Japan, Russia and Germany in an effort to extend its R&D scope and promote opportunities for international cooperation. In offering this prize, ITRI has the support of numerous partners, including: European Chamber of Commerce Taipei, ITS Taiwan, Promotion Center for Network Applications and Services Platform Technology Consortium, Promotion Center for the Advanced Networking and Communication Consortium, Taiwan Telematics Industry Association, Vehicle-Infrastructure Technology Affiliates Laboratory, Institute for Information Industry, Advanced Lithium Electrochemistry ( Aleees ), Hua-chuang Automobile Information Technical Center ( HAITEC ), National Chiao Tung University, NTU Green Campus Transportation System R&D Team, Partners for Advanced Transportation TecHnology ( PATH ), Taiwan Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers' Association (TEEMA ).

About the European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC)
The ESNC is an international competition that recognises the best ideas in the field of satellite navigation every year. From companies and research institutes to students and other independent individuals, anyone is free to enter. The only thing that matters is your idea! Innovation proposals can be submitted at from 1 April to 30 June 2012.
The ESNC was inaugurated in three regions under the patronage of the Bavarian Ministry of Economic Affairs in 2004. Since then, the competition has transformed into a leading network that embodies innovation and expertise. Supporting the ESNC this year as new regional partners are Austria, Bulgaria, Finland, Ireland, North America, Poland, and Portugal. This brings the number of regions now competing for the distinction of having produced the overall winner - the Galileo Master - to more than 20.

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