Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New dynamic dependency framework may lead to better neural social and tech systems models

25.02.2019

Many real-world complex systems include macroscopic subsystems which influence one another. This arises, for example, in competing or mutually reinforcing neural populations in the brain, spreading dynamics of viruses, and elsewhere. It is therefore important to understand how different types of inter-system interactions can influence overall collective behaviors.

In 2010 substantial progress was made when the theory of percolation on interdependent networks was introduced by Prof. Shlomo Havlin and a team of researchers from the Department of Physics at Bar-Ilan University in a study published in Nature.


In a paper published recently in Nature Physics, Bar-Ilan University Prof. Havlin, and a team of researchers, including Stefano Boccaletti, Ivan Bonamassa, and Michael M. Danziger, present a dynamic dependency framework that can capture interdependent and competitive interactions between dynamic systems which are used to study synchronization and spreading processes in multilayer networks with interacting layers. Main results in this image. (Top Left) Phase diagram for two partially competitive Kuramoto models with regions of multistability. (Top Right) Theoretical and numerical results for the ow in interdependent SIS epidemics (Erdos-Renyi graphs, average degree = 12). (Bottom Left) Path-dependent (awakening) transitions in asymmetrically coupled SIS dynamics. (Bottom Right) Critical scaling of bottlenecks (ghosts in saddle-node bifurcations) above the hybrid transitions in interdependent dynamics

Credit: Prof. Shlomo Havlin and team

This model showed that when nodes in one network depend on nodes in another to function, catastrophic cascades of failures and abrupt structural transitions arise, as was observed in the electrical blackout that affected much of Italy in 2003.

Interdependent percolation, however, is limited to systems where functionality is determined exclusively by connectivity, thus providing only a partial understanding to a wealth of real-world systems whose functionality is defined according to dynamical rules.

Research has shown that two fundamental ways in which nodes in one system can influence nodes in another one are interdependence (or cooperation), as in critical infrastructures or financial networks, and antagonism (or competition), as observed in ecological systems, social networks, or in the human brain.

Interdependent and competitive interactions may also occur simultaneously, as observed in predator-prey relationships in ecological systems, and in binocular rivalry in the brain.

In a paper published recently in Nature Physics, Bar-Ilan University Prof. Havlin, and a team of researchers, including Stefano Boccaletti, Ivan Bonamassa, and Michael M. Danziger, present a dynamic dependency framework that can capture interdependent and competitive interactions between dynamic systems which are used to study synchronization and spreading processes in multilayer networks with interacting layers.

"This dynamic dependency framework provides a powerful tool to better understand many of the interacting complex systems which surround us," wrote Havlin and team. "The generalization of dependent interactions from percolation to dynamical systems allows for the development of new models for neural, social and technological systems that better capture the subtle ways in which different systems can affect one another."

Prof. Havlin's research since 2000 has produced groundbreaking new mathematical methods in network science which have led to extensive interdisciplinary research in the field. Following Havlin's and his colleagues' publication of the theory of percolation, he received the American Physical Society's Lilienfeld Prize, which is awarded for "a most outstanding contribution to physics". Earlier this year he received the Israel Prize in Chemistry and Physics.

Elana Oberlander | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41567-018-0343-1

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Magnetic micro-boats
21.03.2019 | Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

nachricht Levitating objects with light
19.03.2019 | California Institute of Technology

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Magnetic micro-boats

Nano- and microtechnology are promising candidates not only for medical applications such as drug delivery but also for the creation of little robots or flexible integrated sensors. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have created magnetic microparticles, with a newly developed method, that could pave the way for building micro-motors or guiding drugs in the human body to a target, like a tumor. The preparation of such structures as well as their remote-control can be regulated using magnetic fields and therefore can find application in an array of domains.

The magnetic properties of a material control how this material responds to the presence of a magnetic field. Iron oxide is the main component of rust but also...

Im Focus: Self-healing coating made of corn starch makes small scratches disappear through heat

Due to the special arrangement of its molecules, a new coating made of corn starch is able to repair small scratches by itself through heat: The cross-linking via ring-shaped molecules makes the material mobile, so that it compensates for the scratches and these disappear again.

Superficial micro-scratches on the car body or on other high-gloss surfaces are harmless, but annoying. Especially in the luxury segment such surfaces are...

Im Focus: Stellar cartography

The Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument (PEPSI) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona released its first image of the surface magnetic field of another star. In a paper in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, the PEPSI team presents a Zeeman- Doppler-Image of the surface of the magnetically active star II Pegasi.

A special technique allows astronomers to resolve the surfaces of faraway stars. Those are otherwise only seen as point sources, even in the largest telescopes...

Im Focus: Heading towards a tsunami of light

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. Ultra-intense light pulses consist of the motion of a single wave and can be described as a tsunami of light. The strong wave can be used to study interactions between matter and light in a unique way. Their research is now published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

"This source of radiation lets us look at reality through a new angle - it is like twisting a mirror and discovering something completely different," says...

Im Focus: Revealing the secret of the vacuum for the first time

New research group at the University of Jena combines theory and experiment to demonstrate for the first time certain physical processes in a quantum vacuum

For most people, a vacuum is an empty space. Quantum physics, on the other hand, assumes that even in this lowest-energy state, particles and antiparticles...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Modelica Conference with 330 visitors from 21 countries at OTH Regensburg

11.03.2019 | Event News

Selection Completed: 580 Young Scientists from 88 Countries at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

01.03.2019 | Event News

LightMAT 2019 – 3rd International Conference on Light Materials – Science and Technology

28.02.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

To proliferate or not to proliferate

21.03.2019 | Life Sciences

Magnetic micro-boats

21.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Motorless pumps and self-regulating valves made from ultrathin film

21.03.2019 | HANNOVER MESSE

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>