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Cleaner Stoves for Developing Countries, Thanks to Heat-Powered Fan Design

11.11.2010
Penn State University research presented at 2nd Pan-American/Iberian Meeting on Acoustics

Paul Montgomery, a graduate student at Pennsylvania State University, is helping design a better cook stove for people in developing countries.

At an upcoming meeting of the 2nd Pan-American/Iberian Meeting on Acoustics in Cancun, Mexico, he will present a simple heat-powered fan that could help to make these stoves more efficient and combat the serious health problems associated with cooking in unventilated spaces.

How important is this? In a speech in September 2010 U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton made a speech in which she underscored the impact of simple stoves on living standards in many parts of the world. More than 3 billion people use open fire cooking to eat daily, she said. But such cooking is very energy inefficient; finding fuel itself is a laborious; the combustion contributes disproportionately to greenhouse warming; and, worst of all, the fumes (often gathering in unventilated rooms) produce air that often exceeds EPA guidelines for healthful air by a factor of 200.

The fumes kill an estimated 1.9 million people a year, according to the United Nations. The World Health Organization cites this smoke as one of the five greatest killers in developing countries. Ms. Clinton’s speech launched a worldwide effort called the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves.

Some moderate-sized devices generate combined heat and power, or CHP. The smallest of these highly-efficient machines can make, for example, 2 kilowatts of heat and 1 kilowatt of electricity. But even this is too much for a person in a rural area to use and too expensive, so Montgomery is trying to make a simple appliance that is 100 times smaller still.

His device, still at the experimental stage, captures some of the stove’s waste heat and converts the heat into sound waves in a simple thermo-acoustic engine. Then the acoustic energy is converted into a tiny bit of electricity in an electro-acoustic transducer. The electricity in turn can partly charge a battery (delivering well-needed lighting after dark) and operate a fan directed at the combustion of the stove’s biofuel, making the whole process more energy efficient.

The more efficient combustion, the less biomass must be burned to cook and the less smoke produced.

"Although a thermo-acoustic cogeneration cook stove would produce only on the order of ten watts of electrical power," he says, "there are probably two billion biomass-fueled cook stoves in use worldwide that might benefit from nano-CHP technology."

The target price for the device that attaches to the stove is $25, says Montgomery, who will report on his ongoing engineering research in Cancun.

Montgomery has written a lay-language paper explaining his research in greater detail, available online: http://www.acoustics.org/press/160th/montgomery.html

The talk "Low-cost thermoacoustic co-generator for biomass burning cook stoves" will be at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 16.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE 2ND PAN-AMERICAN/IBERIAN MEETING ON ACOUSTICS

The 2nd Pan-American/Iberian Meeting on Acoustics takes place at the Fiesta Americana Grand Coral Beach Hotel in Cancun, Mexico, Monday through Friday, November 15-19, 2010. The Fiesta Americana Grand Coral Beach Hotel is located at Blvd. Kukulcán km. 9.5, Cancún Hotel Zone, Cancún, Q.R., 77500. The hotel's main numbers are +52 (998) 881 32 00 and, toll-free, 1-888-830-9008.

USEFUL LINKS

- Main meeting website: http://asa.aip.org/cancun/cancun.html
- Full meeting program: http://asa.aip.org/cancun/program.html
- Searchable index: http://asa.aip.org/asasearch.html
- Hotel site:
http://www.fiestamericanagrand.com/portal/
p/es_MX/FAG/FCB/1/0/Availability/showMinisitioM2.do?
showContenido=/descripcionhotel/FCBdescripcionhotel_M2.html&idioma=en_MX
WORLD WIDE PRESS ROOM
ASA's World Wide Press Room (www.acoustics.org/press) contains tips on dozens of newsworthy stories and with lay-language papers, which are 300-1200 word summaries of presentations written by scientists for a general audience and accompanied by photos, audio and video.

PRESS REGISTRATION

We will grant free registration to credentialed full-time journalists and professional freelance journalists working on assignment for major news outlets. If you are a reporter and would like to attend, please contact Jason Bardi (jbardi@aip.org, 301-209-3091), who can also help with setting up interviews and obtaining images, sound clips, or background information.

ABOUT THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA
The Acoustical Society of America (ASA) is the premier international scientific society in acoustics devoted to the science and technology of sound. Its 7,500 members worldwide represent a broad spectrum of the study of acoustics. ASA publications include The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America -- the world's leading journal on acoustics -- Acoustics Today magazine, books, and standards on acoustics. The society also holds two major scientific meetings each year. For more information about ASA, visit our website at: http://asa.aiporg

Jason S. Bardi | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.aip.org

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