Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New sound recording device helps doctors study link between cough and reflux

28.09.2010
Coughing episodes are closely related to gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in patients who experience chronic cough, irrespective of other diagnoses, according to a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute. Gastroesophageal reflux occurs when the acid contents of the stomach back up, or reflux, into the esophagus. This typically produces heartburn, a burning sensation below the sternum where your ribs come together.

"This is the first study to investigate the temporal relationship between cough and reflux events using a validated sound recording device to register the precise timing and occurrence of actual cough sounds," said Jaclyn A. Smith, PhD, MRCP, of the University of Manchester and lead author of the study. "By using this novel approach, which helps prevent under-reporting of coughing occurrences, we are better able to identify how cough events and reflux events are linked to one another." Watch Dr. Smith discuss her study at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=snrbfc7_iag.

Cough — regardless of cause and duration — is the most common symptom for which patients seek medical attention. Chronic cough (i.e., persists for more than eight weeks) is estimated to affect 11 percent to 20 percent of the population, has a high socioeconomic impact and results in significant reduction in quality of life. Proposed causes of chronic cough include gastroesophageal reflux, rhino-sinusitis and asthma, although recent studies suggest that targeting such mechanisms with drugs only results in approximately half of patients reporting symptom relief.

The majority of studies assessing reflux-cough associations have used a data logger and/or symptom diary to record coughs, which has been shown to significantly under-report the occurrence of coughing. However, in this study, novel ambulatory cough sound recordings, which allowed patients to continue with their normal routines, together with simultaneous impedance/pH monitoring (i.e., preferable technology for establishing symptom-reflux association) over 24 hours, was carried out in 71 patients with chronic cough, aged 51 to 64 years. The recordings were performed using a custom-built validated recording device and microphone; cough was manually counted using software with an audiovisual display. In addition, all patients underwent cough reflex sensitivity testing to citric acid, and 66 patients underwent gastroscopy.

The study researchers found that 70 percent of patients exhibited temporal associations, with 48 percent having a positive symptom association probability for cough preceded by reflux; 56 percent had a positive symptom association probability for reflux preceded by cough; and 32 percent had both.

The presence of cough preceding reflux points to the possible existence of a self-perpetuating cycle maintaining chronic cough. These results may partly explain the poor efficacy of traditional drugs, such as those targeting gastric acidity in the treatment of chronic cough.

To learn more about gastroesophageal reflux disease, visit the patient center on the AGA Web site at http://www.gastro.org/patient-center.

About the AGA Institute

The American Gastroenterological Association is the trusted voice of the GI community. Founded in 1897, the AGA has grown to include 17,000 members from around the globe who are involved in all aspects of the science, practice and advancement of gastroenterology. The AGA Institute administers the practice, research and educational programs of the organization. www.gastro.org.

About Gastroenterology

Gastroenterology, the official journal of the AGA Institute, is the most prominent scientific journal in the specialty and is in the top 1 percent of indexed medical journals internationally. The journal publishes clinical and basic science studies of all aspects of the digestive system, including the liver and pancreas, as well as nutrition. The journal is abstracted and indexed in Biological Abstracts, CABS, Chemical Abstracts, Current Contents, Excerpta Medica, Index Medicus, Nutrition Abstracts and Science Citation Index. For more information, visit www.gastrojournal.org.

Become an AGA fan on Facebook.

Join our LinkedIn group.

Follow us on Twitter @AmerGastroAssn.

Check out our videos on YouTube.

Alissa J. Cruz | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.gastro.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Study tracks inner workings of the brain with new biosensor
16.08.2018 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Foods of the future
15.08.2018 | Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

17.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Robots as Tools and Partners in Rehabilitation

17.08.2018 | Information Technology

Climate Impact Research in Hannover: Small Plants against Large Waves

17.08.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>