Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Few women regret sterilization procedures

18.06.2002


Few of the women who undergo tubal sterilization or whose husbands undergo vasectomy later go on to regret either procedure, according to a study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The study appears in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.



The study found the proportion of women who experience regret was essentially the same -about 6 to 7 percent-five years after their husbands’ vasectomy or their own tubal sterilization. The study also found that substantial conflict between a woman and her husband increases the risk of regret after either vasectomy or tubal sterilization.

"This study is reassuring in that a comparatively small number of the women in the study experienced regret after either they or their husbands underwent a voluntary sterilization procedure," said Duane Alexander, M.D., Director of the NICHD. "However, the finding also underscores the importance of the health care professional in providing thorough counseling for those considering sterilization as a means of family planning."


The researchers, Denise J. Jamieson, M.D. and her colleagues, analyzed data from The U.S. Collaborative Review of Sterilization (CREST), which enrolled women ages 18 to 44 who underwent tubal sterilization at medical centers in six cities around the country between 1985 and 1987. This analysis included data collected from 3,672 sterilized women and 525 other women whose husbands underwent vasectomy, all of whom were asked about regret at follow up visits throughout the course of the study.

Although earlier CREST papers addressed the probability of regret among a larger group of sterilized women, the current report is the first to evaluate regret among women whose husbands underwent vasectomy and to make comparisons to women undergoing tubal sterilization.

The researchers found that the chance of a woman experiencing regret within 5 years after her husband’s vasectomy was only 6.1 percent, a figure which did not differ significantly from the 7.0 percent of women who, 5 years later, regretted tubal sterilization.

"It’s reassuring that such large percentages of those who chose either vasectomy or tubal sterilization were satisfied with their decisions," said one of the paper’s authors, Steven Kaufman, M.D., of NICHD’s Contraception and Reproductive Health Branch. Similarly, the researchers found that the overall cumulative probability of the woman requesting that the vasectomy be reversed was low-2.0 percent-and statistically indistinguishable from the corresponding figure (2.2 percent) for women requesting reversal of tubal sterilization.

Women who experienced substantial conflict with their husbands before the husbands’ vasectomy were more than 25 times as likely to request that their husbands undergo vasectomy reversal as those who did not experience such conflict. Among couples with substantial conflict prior to tubal sterilization, the woman was about 3 times as likely to express regret and 5 times as likely to request reversal as those not reporting such conflict. The study did not ask women to specify the nature of the conflict, so the authors do not know whether the conflicts were about the sterilization procedure or about other matters.

"In counseling patients about contraceptive options, the probability of regret associated with both male and female sterilization should be addressed, as should the possibility of regret associated with unintended pregnancy for women who do not choose a highly effective method of contraception," the investigators wrote.


The NICHD is part of the National Institutes of Health, the biomedical research arm of the federal government. The Institute sponsors research on development, before and after birth; maternal, child, and family health; reproductive biology and population issues; and medical rehabilitation. NICHD publications, as well as information about the Institute, are available from the NICHD Web site, http://www.nichd.nih.gov, or from the NICHD Clearinghouse, 1-800-370-2943; e-mail NICHDClearinghouse@mail.nih.gov.


Marianne Duffy | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Correct antibiotic dosing could preserve lung microbial diversity in cystic fibrosis
22.02.2019 | Children's National Health System

nachricht Researchers find trigger that turns strep infections into flesh-eating disease
19.02.2019 | Houston Methodist

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: (Re)solving the jet/cocoon riddle of a gravitational wave event

An international research team including astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has combined radio telescopes from five continents to prove the existence of a narrow stream of material, a so-called jet, emerging from the only gravitational wave event involving two neutron stars observed so far. With its high sensitivity and excellent performance, the 100-m radio telescope in Effelsberg played an important role in the observations.

In August 2017, two neutron stars were observed colliding, producing gravitational waves that were detected by the American LIGO and European Virgo detectors....

Im Focus: Light from a roll – hybrid OLED creates innovative and functional luminous surfaces

Up to now, OLEDs have been used exclusively as a novel lighting technology for use in luminaires and lamps. However, flexible organic technology can offer much more: as an active lighting surface, it can be combined with a wide variety of materials, not just to modify but to revolutionize the functionality and design of countless existing products. To exemplify this, the Fraunhofer FEP together with the company EMDE development of light GmbH will be presenting hybrid flexible OLEDs integrated into textile designs within the EU-funded project PI-SCALE for the first time at LOPEC (March 19-21, 2019 in Munich, Germany) as examples of some of the many possible applications.

The Fraunhofer FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, has long been involved in the development of...

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Global Legal Hackathon at HAW Hamburg

11.02.2019 | Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

JILA researchers make coldest quantum gas of molecules

22.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Understanding high efficiency of deep ultraviolet LEDs

22.02.2019 | Materials Sciences

Russian scientists show changes in the erythrocyte nanostructure under stress

22.02.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>