Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

More orthodontic treatment needed among children born prematurely

28.04.2009
Children born before week 33 may need more orthodontic care than full-term children do. Premature children also have more complicated deviations in their bite. This is shown in a new dissertation from Liselott Paulsson at the Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, in Sweden.

"This is a new group of children who need to be given more attention in dental care," says the specialist dentist Liselotte Paulsson at the Division for Odontology at Malmö University. On April 24 she defended her dissertation Premature Birth - Studies on Orthodontic Treatment Need, Craniofacial Morphology, and Function.

Most children who are born prematurely need help with their respiration during the first few weeks of life. This means that they breathe with the aid of a plastic tube connected to a respirator. The tube is placed in either the mouth or the nose, so called intubation. Results of earlier studies have indicated that children that receive this breathing support run a greater risk of developing bite deviations. The risk is especially great for those children who have had the tube in their mouth.

Today nasal intubation is used for the most part at Swedish hospitals, but Liselotte Paulsson's studies show that these children also have more bite deviations than full-term children.

"In my studies the premature children had had intubation through the nose only," she says, pointing out that it is important that the needs of these children be attended to in dental care.

A total of 114 children participated in the studies. They were divided into three groups: children born before week 29, children born between week 20 and 32, and full-term children born in week 40.

The children were examined when they were between eight and ten years old, and the results show that 52 percent of the premature children needed to be treated for bite deviations compared with 37 percent for the full-term children. The studies also show that the premature children weighed less, had smaller head circumferences, and had smaller upper jaws.

"It shows that they have not caught up in their growth. It may be these differences that underlie the fact that they have more bite deviations, but more research is needed before we can know this for certain," says Liselotte Paulsson, who hopes it will therefore be possible to follow up these children between the ages of 16 and 17.

Even though they have more bite deviations and a greater need for orthodontic treatment, premature children do not have more symptoms in the form of pain in the jaws or jaw joints or headaches compared with other children.

"I'm happy to be able to give parents reassuring news on this point, and bite deviations can also be steered in the right direction using various forms of braces," says Liselotte Paulsson.

Liselotte Paulsson
E-mail: liselotte.paulsson@mah.se
Phone: +46 (0)40 - 6658473
Cell phone: +46 (0)708-705669

Hanna Holm | idw
Further information:
http://www.vr.se

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht The genes are not to blame
20.07.2018 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Targeting headaches and tumors with nano-submarines
20.07.2018 | Universitätsmedizin der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers

A new manufacturing technique uses a process similar to newspaper printing to form smoother and more flexible metals for making ultrafast electronic devices.

The low-cost process, developed by Purdue University researchers, combines tools already used in industry for manufacturing metals on a large scale, but uses...

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

A smart safe rechargeable zinc ion battery based on sol-gel transition electrolytes

20.07.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Reversing cause and effect is no trouble for quantum computers

20.07.2018 | Information Technology

Princeton-UPenn research team finds physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern

20.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>