Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New theranostic strategy developed for precise tumor diagnosis and therapy

26.06.2018

Intelligent nanomaterials bridge the conventional concepts of 'molecule' and 'nano' in the bioimaging field

A novel, intelligent theranostic agent for precise tumor diagnosis and therapy has been developed that remains as small molecules while circulating in the bloodstream, can then self-assemble into larger nanostructures in the tumor, and be activated by the tumor microenvironment for therapy guided by photoacoustic imaging. The research was presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).


An intelligent theranostic agent of molybdenum-based polyoxometalate clusters (denoted as Ox-POM) was developed to respond to the tumor microenvironment for precise photoacoustic imaging of tumor and photothermal therapy under near-infrared irradiation.

Credit: D. Ni and W. Cai et al., Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisc.

Usage Restrictions: Use at least title and credit; best with caption included

"Although various types of imaging agents have been developed for photoacoustic (PA) imaging, relatively few imaging agents exhibit high selectivity to the tumor microenvironment for on-demand PA imaging and therapy," Dalong Ni, PhD, a postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging and Nanotechnology Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (Website: http://mi.wisc.edu; PI: Weibo Cai, PhD), explains.

"In this study, an intelligent theranostic agent of molybdenum-based polyoxometalate clusters (denoted as Ox-POM) was designed. These clusters work like an intelligent "nano-robot" in vivo, first searching the tumor area (which can be noninvasively images with PA imaging) and then killing tumor cells (photothermal therapy after it self-assembled in the tumor microenvironment)."

Ni points out, "Unlike traditional chemotherapy, the designed intelligent Ox-POM clusters, obtained from an easy, fast, and large-scale synthesis process, will only cause damage in tumor areas but not to the normal tissues and organs. Importantly, like most clinical imaging agents, these nanoclusters are mainly excreted through the kidneys, making them highly biocompatible and reducing the potential toxic effects on patients."

Tumor-bearing mice were tested with this novel system of redox-activated PA imaging-guided photothermal therapy (PTT). Redox is short for reduction-oxidation reaction. In this study, the ultra-small Ox-POM clusters accumulate in the tumor and are reduced in the tumor microenvironment. They then get protonated and self-assemble into much larger nanoparticles that are near-infrared (NIR) absorptive. Systematic in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to evaluate their bioresponsive and theranostic capability.

Results from positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with zirconium-89-labeled Ox-POM showed these clusters could escape from recognition by the liver and spleen and were mainly excreted through the kidneys, which is highly desirable for reducing potential toxic effects. Studies in the tumor-bearing mice showed that the PA signal was detected in the tumors as early as one hour post-injection.

Under laser irradiation, the temperature of the tumor rapidly increased, reaching above 40 °C in 30 seconds and reaching 52 °C in five minutes; the tumor growth was eliminated without subsequent recurrence for a prolonged period of up to 2 months, whereas the control groups demonstrated rapid tumor growth.

Ni states, "As a proof-of-concept, our findings explore a new strategy for precise tumor diagnosis and therapy, which is also expected to establish a new class of theranostic agents based on clusters, bridging the conventional concepts of "molecule" and "nano" in the bioimaging field."

He adds, "These are exciting smart nanomaterials (target and/or respond to cancer and efficiently clear from the body) for potential clinical translation. On-demand tumor diagnosis and therapy triggered by physiological microenvironment characteristics of tumors can simultaneously reduce the damage of anticancer agents to normal organs/tissues and improve therapeutic efficacy."

###

Abstract 188: "Redox-Activated Photoacoustic Imaging-Guided Photothermal Therapy with Bioresponsive Polyoxometalate Cluster," Dalong NI, PhD, Dawei Jiang, PhD, Emily B. Ehlerding, Todd E. Barnhart, PhD, and Weibo Cai, PhD, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI; Bo Yu, PhD, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI, and School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan, China; and Weijun Wei, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China. SNMMI 2018 Annual Meeting, June 23-26, 2018, Philadelphia.

Link to Abstract

Please visit the SNMMI Media Center for more information about molecular imaging and personalized medicine. To schedule an interview with the researchers, please contact Laurie Callahan at 703-652-6773 or lcallahan@snmmi.org. 2018 SNMMI Annual Meeting abstracts can be found online at http://jnm.snmjournals.org/content/59/supplement_1. Current and past issues of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine are online at http://jnm.snmjournals.org.

ABOUT THE SOCIETY OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) is an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to advancing nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, vital elements of precision medicine that allow diagnosis and treatment to be tailored to individual patients in order to achieve the best possible outcomes.

SNMMI's more than 16,000 members set the standard for molecular imaging and nuclear medicine practice by creating guidelines, sharing information through journals and meetings and leading advocacy on key issues that affect molecular imaging and therapy research and practice. For more information, visit http://www.snmmi.org.

Laurie F Callahan | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Discovery shows promise for treating Huntington's Disease
05.08.2020 | Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

nachricht Carbon monoxide improves endurance performance
05.08.2020 | Universität Bayreuth

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New Strategy Against Osteoporosis

An international research team has found a new approach that may be able to reduce bone loss in osteoporosis and maintain bone health.

Osteoporosis is the most common age-related bone disease which affects hundreds of millions of individuals worldwide. It is estimated that one in three women...

Im Focus: AI & single-cell genomics

New software predicts cell fate

Traditional single-cell sequencing methods help to reveal insights about cellular differences and functions - but they do this with static snapshots only...

Im Focus: TU Graz Researchers synthesize nanoparticles tailored for special applications

“Core-shell” clusters pave the way for new efficient nanomaterials that make catalysts, magnetic and laser sensors or measuring devices for detecting electromagnetic radiation more efficient.

Whether in innovative high-tech materials, more powerful computer chips, pharmaceuticals or in the field of renewable energies, nanoparticles – smallest...

Im Focus: Tailored light inspired by nature

An international research team with Prof. Cornelia Denz from the Institute of Applied Physics at the University of Münster develop for the first time light fields using caustics that do not change during propagation. With the new method, the physicists cleverly exploit light structures that can be seen in rainbows or when light is transmitted through drinking glasses.

Modern applications as high resolution microsopy or micro- or nanoscale material processing require customized laser beams that do not change during...

Im Focus: NYUAD astrophysicist investigates the possibility of life below the surface of Mars

  • A rover expected to explore below the surface of Mars in 2022 has the potential to provide more insights
  • The findings published in Scientific Reports, Springer Nature suggests the presence of traces of water on Mars, raising the question of the possibility of a life-supporting environment

Although no life has been detected on the Martian surface, a new study from astrophysicist and research scientist at the Center for Space Science at NYU Abu...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2020”: The final touches for surfaces

23.07.2020 | Event News

Conference radar for cybersecurity

21.07.2020 | Event News

Contact Tracing Apps against COVID-19: German National Academy Leopoldina hosts international virtual panel discussion

07.07.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Manifestation of quantum distance in flat band materials

05.08.2020 | Physics and Astronomy

Discovery shows promise for treating Huntington's Disease

05.08.2020 | Health and Medicine

Rock debris protects glaciers from climate change more than previously known

05.08.2020 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>