Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Accurate evaluation of chondral injuries by near infrared spectroscopy

22.10.2018

Osteoarthritis is a disabling disease characterised by joint pain and restricted mobility, affecting especially the elderly. The disease generally progresses slowly, even over decades. Post-traumatic osteoarthritis, however, affects people of all ages and is initiated by joint trauma, for example, as a result of falling. The disease is most prevalent in articulating joints, such as the knee.

Although no cure currently exists for osteoarthritis, early detection of cartilage lesions could enable halting the disease progression by pharmacological or surgical means. Conventionally, joint health is diagnosed based on patients' symptoms, joint mobility and, if required, with x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging.


The novel arthroscopic probe in an equine knee joint in vivo with the probe tip in contact with cartilage surface (inset).

Credit: Jaakko Sarin

Based on these examinations, joint repair surgery may be performed during arthroscopy. The decision on the optimal treatment option is made during the surgery, in which the joint health is evaluated visually and by palpating the cartilage surface with a metallic hook. These techniques are subjective and dependent on surgeons' experience and can, therefore, influence the treatment outcome.

An arthroscopic near infrared spectroscopic probe for evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone structure and composition was developed as part of a PhD thesis at the University of Eastern Finland.

The probe enables enhanced detection of cartilage injuries, as well as evaluation of the integrity of the surrounding tissue. The availability of comprehensive information on the health of joint tissues could substantially enhance the treatment outcome of arthroscopic intervention.

Previously, the near infrared spectroscopy technique has been utilised in, for example, evaluation of grain quality, but its clinical applications are still rare. However, clinical application of the technique is now possible thanks to better availability of computational power along with state-of-the-art mathematical modelling methods, such as neural networks.

With these methods, the relationship between the absorption of near infrared light and tissue properties can be determined. This enables reliable determination of articular cartilage stiffness and subchondral bone mineral density -- changes in these tissue properties are prognostic indicators of osteoarthritis.

Since near infrared spectroscopy is not optimal for imaging of tissues, arthroscopically applicable imaging techniques, such as optical coherence tomography and ultrasound imaging, were also used in the study. These techniques have been previously applied in intravascular imaging via specialized 1 mm diameter catheters, which are therefore well-suited for imaging narrow joint cavities. The study compared the reliability of these techniques for evaluation of chondral injuries with that of conventional arthroscopic evaluation.

"Optical coherence tomography was superior to conventional arthroscopy and ultrasound imaging. In contrast to conventional arthroscopic evaluation, optical coherence tomography and ultrasound imaging provide information on inner structures of cartilage and enable, for example, detection of cartilage detachment from subchondral bone," Researcher Jaakko Sarin from the University of Eastern Finland explains.

###

The doctoral dissertation, entitled Evaluation of chondral injuries using near infrared spectroscopy, is available for download at http://epublications.uef.fi/pub/urn_isbn_978-952-61-2910-5/urn_isbn_978-952-61-2910-5.pdf

The findings were originally reported in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, Annals of Biomedical Engineering, and Scientific Reports.

For further information, please contact:

Researcher Jaakko Sarin, tel. +358 40 767 7216, jaakko.sarin@uef.fi

Open access article:

Arthroscopic near infrared spectroscopy enables simultaneous quantitative evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone in vivo. Jaakko K. Sarin, Nikae C. R. te Moller,Irina A. D. Mancini, Harold Brommer, Jetze Visser, Jos Malda, P. René van Weeren, Isaac O. Afara & Juha Töyräs. Scientific Reports, volume 8, Article number: 13409 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-31670-5

Media Contact

Jaakko Sarin
jaakko.sarin@uef.fi
358-407-677-216

 @UniEastFinland

http://www.uef.fi 

Jaakko Sarin | EurekAlert!

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht A 15-minute scan could help diagnose brain damage in newborns
15.11.2018 | Imperial College London

nachricht NIH scientists combine technologies to view the retina in unprecedented detail
14.11.2018 | NIH/National Eye Institute

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

How Humans and Machines Navigate Complex Situations

19.11.2018 | Science Education

Finding plastic litter from afar

19.11.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Channels for the Supply of Energy

19.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>