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Show me your leaves - Health check for urban trees

12.12.2017

Trees are known to provide a whole range of benefits to people living in cities. For instance, they reduce air pollution, and provide cooling through respiration and shade. When trees become unhealthy, these benefits decline, and disease-ridden, unstable trees can even become dangerous to people. However, the traditional field inventories to check on trees are labour-intensive and expensive.
Today, researchers from KU Leuven will present a fast, cost-efficient and objective method to map, evaluate and monitor the health of urban trees at the ‘Ecology Across Borders’ conference in Ghent, Belgium.

The researchers combined images from two specialised sensors mounted in airplanes to evaluate the density and colour of leaves on individual trees in the city of Brussels. First, they used LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data to detect and delineate individual trees. LiDAR data consists of very accurate distance measurements between the airplane and objects on the ground, generating a detailed 3D representation of the city.


Map of the study area within the Brussels Capital Region (black frames), including the locations of trees which were used for validation of the remote sensing data (colourful symbols).

Illustration: Jeroen Degerickx


Left: 3D-Illustration of LiDAR results (different colours represent different heights above ground). Right: An algorithm detects individual trees, based on LiDAR data.

Illustration: Jeroen Degerickx, Data source: Aerodata International Surveys

Secondly, they employed hyperspectral data to determine the density and health of the trees’ leaves. ‘Hyperspectral’ means that the wavelength pattern of light reflected from objects is measured in very high resolution. Each object reflects different parts of the light’s spectrum depending on its properties like colour, chemical components and structure. As trees suffering from a disease or environmental stress become less green and have less leaves (showing more of the surface below), this data allows to distinguish healthy from unhealthy trees.

This study focuses on the four most common tree species used in public green spaces and along roads in Brussels and in other Flemish cities, i.e. maple (Acer spp.), horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), sycamore (Platanus spp.) and lime (Tilia spp.). Information from airplane data was compared with with traditional field inventories for ca. 25 trees of each species.

“This airborne mapping of tree health represents a huge extension to the currently implemented, labour-intensive field inventories and could thus greatly benefit urban green managers”, says Jeroen Degerickx, the lead-author of this study. “Remote sensing technology definitely holds great potential for research on urban tree health. Unlike field inventories, the information extracted from remote sensing data is more objective, quantitative, covers a large and continuous area at once and can be easily repeated over time”, he adds.

Trees in urban areas suffer from all kinds of different stress factors which are not or much less present in natural environments. Soil and air pollution result in urban trees ingesting high quantities of heavy metals and other harmful substances. Trees along roads are often damaged by the excessive amounts of salt that are dispersed in winter to keep roads ice-free. Soils in urban environments are often very shallow (e.g. due to the presence of underlying structures) and trees are frequently planted in very confined spaces. Both of these factors are limiting space for roots to grow and hence increase the risk of water and nutrient stress. The risk of water stress in urban environments is additionally aggravated by the fact that cities are warmer compared to the surrounding rural areas, a phenomenon termed the urban heat island effect.

“Given the elevated occurrence of stress factors in urban environments, in combination with the clear implications of tree health on the functioning and stability of urban ecosystems and on the quality of life of its inhabitants, I would say that urban tree health in general is or should be an important issue to be considered in any city and any country across the globe”, Degerickx says.

There are plans to implement the new method in public monitoring schemes in the near future. “We are already in contact with the urban green management team of Brussels and the overarching organisation for public green spaces in Flanders (VVOG), which both clearly expressed their interest in our research, indicating that urban tree health is indeed a pressing issue”, states Degerickx.

This study is part of the international research project UrbanEARS , which explores the potential of remote sensing data to model water and heat dynamics in urban environments. As urban green areas are known to have major impacts on these dynamics, an important part of the project is dedicated to mapping and characterising these areas.

Jeroen Degerickx will present his work at the ‘Ecology Across Borders’ conference on Tuesday, 12 December 2017.

This year’s annual meeting is jointly organised by the British Ecological Society, Gesellschaft für Ökologie (the Ecological Society of Germany, Switzerland and Austria), and Dutch-Flemish Ecological Society (NecoV), in association with the European Ecological Federation, bringing together 1,500 ecologists from around 60 countries to discuss the latest advances in ecological research across the whole discipline.

- Ends –

Notes to Editors

Links to ressources:
UrbanEARS: https://www.urbanears-project.com
'Ecology Across Borders', the joint annual meeting of GfÖ, BES, NecoV and EEF:
http://www.britishecologicalsociety.org/events/annual-meeting-2017/

For more information about this study and/or to arrange an interview with the author, please contact:
Jeroen Degerickx, KU Leuven, Email: jeroen.degerickx@kuleuven.be, Mobile: +32(0) 473 58 48 20, or Prof. Ben Somers, KU Leuven, Email: ben.somers@kuleuven.be, Tel: +32(0) 498 68 83 62

For more information on the meeting, high-resolution images or to request press access, please contact:
Juliane Röder, Press Officer, Ecological Society of Germany, Austria and Switzerland, Email: presse@gfoe.org, Tel: +49 (0)6421 28 23381, Mobile: +49 (0)179 64 68 958

High-resolution images are available on request.

The ‘Joint Annual Meeting: Ecology Across Borders’ is taking place at ICC Ghent, Belgium from 11-14 December 2017. The full programme is available here: https://eventmobi.com/eab2017/

Follow the event on social media #EAB2017

About the Gesellschaft für Ökologie
The Gesellschaft für Ökologie e.V. (GfÖ) represents ecologists working on basic research, applied aspects and education, mostly from Germany, Austria and Switzerland. It was founded in 1970 to support exchange among ecologists working on a wide range of topics and positions. The diversity of the society’s over 1,150 members is reflected in the GfÖ’s specialist groups, publications and annual meetings. gfoe.org @GfOe_org

About the British Ecological Society
Founded in 1913, the British Ecological Society (BES) is the oldest ecological society in the world. The BES promotes the study of ecology through publishing a range of scientific literature, organising and sponsoring a wide variety of events, education initiatives and policy work. The society has over 6,000 members from nearly 130 different countries. britishecologicalsociety.org @BritishEcolSoc

About the Dutch-Flemish Ecological Society
The Dutch-Flemish Ecological Society (NecoV) was created by the merger of two ecological associations in the Dutch-Flemish language region, and aims to promote fundamental and applied ecology in the Netherlands and in Flanders, to promote national and international cooperation between ecologists, and to promote responsible management of the biosphere. NecoV organises meetings, symposia, seminars, courses, thematic working groups and other ecologically oriented activities. necov.org

About the European Ecological Federation
The European Ecological Federation (EEF) is the umbrella organisation representing the ecological societies within Europe and associated members. Instead of an individual membership, application process membership is granted automatically to members of a national society already represented in the EEF. The European Ecological Federation enables cooperation between ecological societies in order to promote the science of ecology in Europe. europeanecology.org @EuropeanEcology

Weitere Informationen:

https://www.urbanears-project.com
http://www.britishecologicalsociety.org/events/annual-meeting-2017/
https://eventmobi.com/eab2017/

Juliane Röder | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: BES EEF Ecological Society leaves urban environments Ökologie

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