Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers at the RUB and from Taiwan discover energy supply for protein secretion

10.05.2012
Out of the cell

Journal of Biological Chemistry: mechanism of bacterial transport system published

In order to interact with the environment, bacteria secrete a whole arsenal of proteins. Researchers have now found how one of the transportation systems used for this purpose – the type VI secretion system – works for the single-celled organism Agrobacterium tumefaciens. They have identified the relevant transport proteins and their energy suppliers.


Export mechanism: To get to the outside, Hcp has to get past two cell membranes. This is only possible if it forms a complex with the two membrane proteins TssM (grey) and TssL (white). The energy for the export is produced by the interaction of TssM with the energy storage molecule ATP. Figure: modified from the Journal of Biological Chemistry

With colleagues at the Academia Sinica in Taiwan, RUB biologist Prof. Dr. Franz Narberhaus describes the findings in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. “The proteins involved also occur in other secretion apparatuses” explains Narberhaus from the Department of Microbial Biology. “Therefore, the results contribute to the general understanding of the system.”

Protein arsenal for many purposes

Bacteria use secreted proteins to make nutrients available, to fend off competitors and to infect human, animal or plant host cells. “Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a fascinating bacterium. It can genetically modify plants and stimulate tumour formation”, says Narberhaus. Five bacterial secretion systems have been known for a long time. The type VI system was only discovered a few years ago. Among other things, it transports the protein Hcp through two membranes into the environment – for what purpose is, as yet, unclear. The question of how the export of Hcp is driven was also unanswered. This is precisely what the German-Taiwanese team has now revealed.

Membrane protein TssM: the driver of the protein export

Narberhaus and his colleagues have shown that two proteins in the cell membrane of the bacteria, called TssL and TssM, are responsible for the export of Hcp. The molecule ATP, a cellular energy store, serves as fuel for the transport process. The membrane protein TssM binds the energy supplier ATP, thereby changing its own structure and splitting the ATP. The energy thus released allows the associated membrane protein TssL to bind its cargo (Hcp) so that a tripartite complex of TssM, TssL and Hcp is formed. Hcp only passes from the bacterial cell into the environment when this complex forms.

Successful cooperation between Bochum und Taiwan

“Large membrane proteins such as TssM are difficult to study biochemically. Our colleagues in Taiwan have done a great job” Prof. Narberhaus explains. “It will now be particularly interesting to explore the biological significance of the system.” The analyses of ATP splitting, also called hydrolysis, were established in Prof. Narberhaus’s laboratory by the doctoral student Lay-Sun Ma during a research visit. “Because of the participation in the Collaborative Research Centre SFB 642 ‘GTP- and ATP-dependent membrane processes’, we are able to offer ideal conditions for working with ATP-dependent proteins” the RUB-biologist explains. This is the second time that the DAAD has funded the cooperation between the laboratories of Franz Narberhaus and Erh-Min Lai. The successful cooperation is also to continue in the future. “It is bound to last for many years”, the Bochum researcher is convinced. The next exchange of doctoral students is planned for autumn.

Bibliographic record

L.-S. Ma, F. Narberhaus, E.-M. Lai (2012): IcmF family protein TssM exhibits ATPase activity and energizes type VI secretion, Journal of Biological Chemistry, doi: 10.1074/jbc.M111.301630

Further information

Prof. Dr. Franz Narberhaus, Department of Microbial Biology, Faculty of Biology and Biotechnology at the Ruhr-Universität, 44780 Bochum, Germany, Tel. +49/234/32-23100

franz.narberhaus@rub.de

Click for more

Microbial biology at the RUB
http://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/mikrobiologie/index_en.html
Editor: Dr. Julia Weiler

Dr. Josef König | idw
Further information:
http://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/
http://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/mikrobiologie/index_en.html

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht The Secret of the Rock Drawings
24.05.2019 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie

nachricht Chemical juggling with three particles
24.05.2019 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New studies increase confidence in NASA's measure of Earth's temperature

A new assessment of NASA's record of global temperatures revealed that the agency's estimate of Earth's long-term temperature rise in recent decades is accurate to within less than a tenth of a degree Fahrenheit, providing confidence that past and future research is correctly capturing rising surface temperatures.

The most complete assessment ever of statistical uncertainty within the GISS Surface Temperature Analysis (GISTEMP) data product shows that the annual values...

Im Focus: The geometry of an electron determined for the first time

Physicists at the University of Basel are able to show for the first time how a single electron looks in an artificial atom. A newly developed method enables them to show the probability of an electron being present in a space. This allows improved control of electron spins, which could serve as the smallest information unit in a future quantum computer. The experiments were published in Physical Review Letters and the related theory in Physical Review B.

The spin of an electron is a promising candidate for use as the smallest information unit (qubit) of a quantum computer. Controlling and switching this spin or...

Im Focus: Self-repairing batteries

UTokyo engineers develop a way to create high-capacity long-life batteries

Engineers at the University of Tokyo continually pioneer new ways to improve battery technology. Professor Atsuo Yamada and his team recently developed a...

Im Focus: Quantum Cloud Computing with Self-Check

With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, open the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics. The research groups led by Rainer Blatt and Peter Zoller report in the journal Nature how they simulated particle physics phenomena on 20 quantum bits and how the quantum simulator self-verified the result for the first time.

Many scientists are currently working on investigating how quantum advantage can be exploited on hardware already available today. Three years ago, physicists...

Im Focus: Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale

'Quantum technologies' utilise the unique phenomena of quantum superposition and entanglement to encode and process information, with potentially profound benefits to a wide range of information technologies from communications to sensing and computing.

However a major challenge in developing these technologies is that the quantum phenomena are very fragile, and only a handful of physical systems have been...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

On Mars, sands shift to a different drum

24.05.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Piedmont Atlanta first in Georgia to offer new minimally invasive treatment for emphysema

24.05.2019 | Medical Engineering

Chemical juggling with three particles

24.05.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>