Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Luxembourg joins EMBL

12.11.2007
The Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg becomes EMBL's 20th member state

Today, the European Molecular Biology Laboratory [EMBL] announces Luxembourg as the new member of its international community. Accepted by EMBL's council and ratified by the parliament of Luxembourg, the Grand-Duchy has officially joined the institute as the 20th member state.

"EMBL is a key player in European molecular biology," says François Biltgen, Minister of Culture, Higher Education and Research, Luxembourg, "being part of its international network will provide a boost for Luxembourg's research in the growing field of molecular biology and will integrate its researchers even better into the European scientific community. In return Luxembourg will contribute to EMBL's various activities bringing in complementary strengths and technical expertise."

Through its membership Luxembourg will contribute to EMBL's pursuit of its five missions: to perform basic research in molecular biology; to train scientists, students and visitors at all levels; to offer vital services to scientists in the member states; to develop new instruments and methods in the life sciences and to actively engage in technology transfer activities. As a member state Luxembourg will benefit from the various services and training programmes that EMBL offers for its member states and it will have access to the research facilities at the five EMBL stations in Heidelberg and Hamburg, Germany, Grenoble, France, Hinxton, UK, and Monterotondo, Italy.

... more about:
»Biology »EMBL' »Luxembourg »member

The delegate representing Luxembourg in EMBL's council will be Josiane Entringer of the Department for Research and Innovation of the Ministry for Culture, Higher Education and Research.

Luxembourg's activities in the molecular life sciences range from basic research in genetics, molecular biology and biomedicine to more applied areas such as cancer research and the development of health technologies. Since the foundation of its University in 2003, Luxembourg has actively contributed to education and training of Europe's scientific elite.

"We are very pleased to welcome Luxembourg as our new member state," says Iain Mattaj, Director General of EMBL, "Luxembourg has substantially contributed to the progress of research in the life sciences in the past years. Its overlapping research interests and its complementary expertise make it a very valuable addition to EMBL."

Anna-Lynn Wegener | alfa
Further information:
http://www.embl.org/aboutus/news/press/2007/12nov07/

Further reports about: Biology EMBL' Luxembourg member

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New gene potentially involved in metastasis identified
26.03.2019 | Institute of Science and Technology Austria

nachricht Decoding the genomes of duckweeds: low mutation rates contribute to low genetic diversity
26.03.2019 | Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New gene potentially involved in metastasis identified

Gene named after Roman goddess Minerva as immune cells get stuck in the fruit fly’s head

Cancers that display a specific combination of sugars, called T-antigen, are more likely to spread through the body and kill a patient. However, what regulates...

Im Focus: The taming of the light screw

DESY and MPSD scientists create high-order harmonics from solids with controlled polarization states, taking advantage of both crystal symmetry and attosecond electronic dynamics. The newly demonstrated technique might find intriguing applications in petahertz electronics and for spectroscopic studies of novel quantum materials.

The nonlinear process of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in gases is one of the cornerstones of attosecond science (an attosecond is a billionth of a...

Im Focus: Magnetic micro-boats

Nano- and microtechnology are promising candidates not only for medical applications such as drug delivery but also for the creation of little robots or flexible integrated sensors. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have created magnetic microparticles, with a newly developed method, that could pave the way for building micro-motors or guiding drugs in the human body to a target, like a tumor. The preparation of such structures as well as their remote-control can be regulated using magnetic fields and therefore can find application in an array of domains.

The magnetic properties of a material control how this material responds to the presence of a magnetic field. Iron oxide is the main component of rust but also...

Im Focus: Self-healing coating made of corn starch makes small scratches disappear through heat

Due to the special arrangement of its molecules, a new coating made of corn starch is able to repair small scratches by itself through heat: The cross-linking via ring-shaped molecules makes the material mobile, so that it compensates for the scratches and these disappear again.

Superficial micro-scratches on the car body or on other high-gloss surfaces are harmless, but annoying. Especially in the luxury segment such surfaces are...

Im Focus: Stellar cartography

The Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument (PEPSI) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona released its first image of the surface magnetic field of another star. In a paper in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, the PEPSI team presents a Zeeman- Doppler-Image of the surface of the magnetically active star II Pegasi.

A special technique allows astronomers to resolve the surfaces of faraway stars. Those are otherwise only seen as point sources, even in the largest telescopes...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Modelica Conference with 330 visitors from 21 countries at OTH Regensburg

11.03.2019 | Event News

Selection Completed: 580 Young Scientists from 88 Countries at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

01.03.2019 | Event News

LightMAT 2019 – 3rd International Conference on Light Materials – Science and Technology

28.02.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Searching for disappeared anti-matter: A successful start to measurements with Belle II

26.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Extremely accurate measurements of atom states for quantum computing

26.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Listening to the quantum vacuum

26.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>