Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bucket with two ears catches DNA

16.05.2003


Dutch PhD student Cathelijne Kloks has discovered that the so-called Cold Shock domain of the human YB-1 protein looks like a bucket with two extra ears. These ears lead the DNA to the binding site on the protein and keep it there.



Kloks investigated the structure and function of one of the three domains of the human protein YB-1. This protein plays an important role in the production of new proteins. The central domain, the so-called Cold Shock domain, ensures the binding of the protein to the DNA in the process.

The researcher from the University of Nijmegen discovered that the domain looks like a bucket with a handle and two extra ears. The ears attach to the DNA and push it to the binding site on the YB-1. This binding site was found to be located precisely in between the two ears. This means that the ears can hold the DNA firmly in place whilst it is being bound to the protein. The function of the handle is not yet clear.


Kloks dissolved the YB-1 protein and then studied the solution using NMR measurements. She used the NMR signals to draw up a distances table, which indicated the distance between the nuclei of atoms in the protein. With this information she then calculated the structure of the Cold Shock domain.

Furthermore, Kloks determined the strength of the binding to the DNA. The Cold Shock domain alone formed weak bonds to the DNA. This did not agree with previously made measurements of the binding strength of the complete YB-1 protein. The domain also exhibited little preference with respect to where it binds to the DNA, although previous experiments had shown that the Cold Shock domain binds more strongly to areas of DNA containing a lot of cytosine and thymine. Kloks concluded that the protein’s considerable binding strength and preference could only be clarified by including its other two domains.

In the cell YB-1 forms the link between the transcription of the DNA and the subsequent production of a new protein. YB-1 consists of three different domains. These are compact parts which can fold independently without using other parts of the protein.

The Cold Shock domain derives its name from its function in bacteria. In bacterial proteins the domain ensures that the bacteria resume growth, following a period of arrested growth due to a sudden drop in temperature.

For further information please contact Cathelijne Kloks (Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organon) tel. +31 (0)412 662461 e-mail: c.kloks@organon.com. The doctoral thesis will be defended on 26 May 2003. Ms Kloks’’ supervisor is Prof. C.W. Hilbers (University of Nijmegen).

Nalinie Moerlie | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nwo.nl

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht TU Bergakademie Freiberg researches virus inhibitors from the sea
27.03.2020 | Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg

nachricht The Venus flytrap effect: new study shows progress in immune proteins research
27.03.2020 | Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Junior scientists at the University of Rostock invent a funnel for light

Together with their colleagues from the University of Würzburg, physicists from the group of Professor Alexander Szameit at the University of Rostock have devised a “funnel” for photons. Their discovery was recently published in the renowned journal Science and holds great promise for novel ultra-sensitive detectors as well as innovative applications in telecommunications and information processing.

The quantum-optical properties of light and its interaction with matter has fascinated the Rostock professor Alexander Szameit since College.

Im Focus: Stem Cells and Nerves Interact in Tissue Regeneration and Cancer Progression

Researchers at the University of Zurich show that different stem cell populations are innervated in distinct ways. Innervation may therefore be crucial for proper tissue regeneration. They also demonstrate that cancer stem cells likewise establish contacts with nerves. Targeting tumour innervation could thus lead to new cancer therapies.

Stem cells can generate a variety of specific tissues and are increasingly used for clinical applications such as the replacement of bone or cartilage....

Im Focus: Artificial solid fog material creates pleasant laser light

An international research team led by Kiel University develops an extremely porous material made of "white graphene" for new laser light applications

With a porosity of 99.99 %, it consists practically only of air, making it one of the lightest materials in the world: Aerobornitride is the name of the...

Im Focus: Cross-technology communication in the Internet of Things significantly simplified

Researchers at Graz University of Technology have developed a framework by which wireless devices with different radio technologies will be able to communicate directly with each other.

Whether networked vehicles that warn of traffic jams in real time, household appliances that can be operated remotely, "wearables" that monitor physical...

Im Focus: Peppered with gold

Research team presents novel transmitter for terahertz waves

Terahertz waves are becoming ever more important in science and technology. They enable us to unravel the properties of future materials, test the quality of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“4th Hybrid Materials and Structures 2020” takes place over the internet

26.03.2020 | Event News

Most significant international Learning Analytics conference will take place – fully online

23.03.2020 | Event News

MOC2020: Fraunhofer IOF organises international micro-optics conference in Jena

03.03.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

3D printer sensors could make breath tests for diabetes possible

27.03.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering

TU Bergakademie Freiberg researches virus inhibitors from the sea

27.03.2020 | Life Sciences

The Venus flytrap effect: new study shows progress in immune proteins research

27.03.2020 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>