Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Rong Li Lab Identifies New Role of Inflammatory Protein in Polycystic Kidney Disease and a Possible Treatment

19.06.2008
The Stowers Institute’s Rong Li Lab has discovered that a protein previously shown to have a role in inflammation may also have a role in the formation of cysts in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) — one of the most common life-threatening genetic diseases — and has shown that a drug inhibiting the protein can slow the disease in mice.

The discovery was published in the advance online publication of Nature Medicine 15 June.

The team showed that a pro-inflammatory cytokine protein — tumor necrosis factor- á (TNF-á) — disrupts the localization of polycystin 2 (the product of a gene mutated in ADPKD) to the plasma membrane and primary cilia in kidney epithelial cells, thus promoting the formation of cysts.

“The interaction between TNF-á and polycystin in the development of cysts is complicated,” said Xiaogang Li, Ph.D., Senior Research Associate in the Rong Li Lab and first author on the paper. “We believe that this interaction could play a significant role in the transition from normal tubule development to the onset of Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) in individuals predisposed for the disease.”

... more about:
»ADPKD »Kidney »PKD »Polycystic »Rong »cysts »specimen processing

Additionally, the team found that the drug etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF-á currently used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and a number of other conditions, prevents the formation of cysts in the kidneys of mice with ADPKD.

“This discovery is especially exciting because it not only provides insight about the origins of ADPKD, but it also points us toward a drug that we believe shows promise in preventing the development of cysts,” said Rong Li, Ph.D., Investigator and senior author on the publication. “Of course, additional research will be required to test these preliminary results in animal models, but the potential is interesting.”

Currently, no treatments are available to prevent or delay the onset of cysts in people living with PKD. Dialysis and kidney transplants are often required as the disease progresses.

Xiaogang Li received a grant from the PKD Foundation earlier this year. The award of $150,000 over two years supports his efforts to understand the origins of PKD. For more information about PKD or the PKD Foundation, visit www.PKDCure.org.

Additional contributing authors from the Stowers Institute include Sheng Xia, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Research Associate; and Teri Johnson, Ph.D., Managing Director - Histology Facility. Also contributing from the University of Kansas Medical Center are James Calvet, Ph.D., Professor; Darren Wallace, Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor; and Brenda Magenheimer, Research Associate, who are supported by an NIH-funded P50 PKD Center grant.

In addition to her appointment at the Stowers Institute, Rong Li also is a Professor in the Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Learn more about her work at www.stowers-institute.org/labs/RongLiLab.asp

About the Stowers Institute
Housed in a 600,000 square-foot state-of-the-art facility on a 10-acre campus in the heart of Kansas City, Missouri, the Stowers Institute for Medical Research conducts basic research on fundamental processes of cellular life. Through its commitment to collaborative research and the use of cutting-edge technology, the Institute seeks more effective means of preventing and curing disease. The Institute was founded by Jim and Virginia Stowers, two cancer survivors who have created combined endowments of $2 billion in support of basic research of the highest quality.

Marie Jennings | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.stowers-institute.org

Further reports about: ADPKD Kidney PKD Polycystic Rong cysts specimen processing

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Numbers count in the genetics of moles and melanomas
16.08.2019 | University of Queensland

nachricht Working out why plants get sick
16.08.2019 | Institut für Pflanzenbiochemie

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots

Soft robots have a distinct advantage over their rigid forebears: they can adapt to complex environments, handle fragile objects and interact safely with humans. Made from silicone, rubber or other stretchable polymers, they are ideal for use in rehabilitation exoskeletons and robotic clothing. Soft bio-inspired robots could one day be deployed to explore remote or dangerous environments.

Most soft robots are actuated by rigid, noisy pumps that push fluids into the machines' moving parts. Because they are connected to these bulky pumps by tubes,...

Im Focus: Vehicle Emissions: New sensor technology to improve air quality in cities

Researchers at TU Graz are working together with European partners on new possibilities of measuring vehicle emissions.

Today, air pollution is one of the biggest challenges facing European cities. As part of the Horizon 2020 research project CARES (City Air Remote Emission...

Im Focus: Self healing robots that "feel pain"

Over the next three years, researchers from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, University of Cambridge, École Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la ville de Paris (ESPCI-Paris) and Empa will be working together with the Dutch Polymer manufacturer SupraPolix on the next generation of robots: (soft) robots that ‘feel pain’ and heal themselves. The partners can count on 3 million Euro in support from the European Commission.

Soon robots will not only be found in factories and laboratories, but will be assisting us in our immediate environment. They will help us in the household, to...

Im Focus: Scientists create the world's thinnest gold

Scientists at the University of Leeds have created a new form of gold which is just two atoms thick - the thinnest unsupported gold ever created.

The researchers measured the thickness of the gold to be 0.47 nanometres - that is one million times thinner than a human finger nail. The material is regarded...

Im Focus: Study on attosecond timescale casts new light on electron dynamics in transition metals

An international team of scientists involving the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has unraveled the light-induced electron-localization dynamics in transition metals at the attosecond timescale. The team investigated for the first time the many-body electron dynamics in transition metals before thermalization sets in. Their work has now appeared in Nature Physics.

The researchers from ETH Zurich (Switzerland), the MPSD (Germany), the Center for Computational Sciences of University of Tsukuba (Japan) and the Center for...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

The power of thought – the key to success: CYBATHLON BCI Series 2019

16.08.2019 | Event News

4th Hybrid Materials and Structures 2020 28 - 29 April 2020, Karlsruhe, Germany

14.08.2019 | Event News

What will the digital city of the future look like? City Science Summit on 1st and 2nd October 2019 in Hamburg

12.08.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Working out why plants get sick

16.08.2019 | Life Sciences

Newfound superconductor material could be the 'silicon of quantum computers'

16.08.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Stanford develops wireless sensors that stick to the skin to track our health

16.08.2019 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>