Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Top-rung research environments singled out

18.02.2005


A panel of acknowledged international experts has identified Sweden’s foremost environments for basic research. The Swedish Research Council will be able to finance ten of the 27 research environments of excellence that have been winnowed from 261 applications. These research teams are from all over the country and represent all disciplinary domains.

“This is proof that Sweden boasts a number of competitive and creative research nodes of the highest international class. It also shows what great breadth Swedish basic research has,” says the chairman of the board at the Swedish Research Council, Bengt Westerberg.
The referees were members of an international panel consisting of seven eminent researchers from different disciplinary domains. In its statement the panel says that all 27 teams address urgent and vital research issues. In any international comparison they are on the cutting edge of their respective fields. If more resources had been available, more than ten environments would have been funded, according to the panel. The Swedish Research Council will be allocating a total of some SEK 44 million per year for five years to the ten teams. “Even though only ten environments have been chosen, this highlights both the quality and the broad scope of pure research in Sweden,” says Pär Omling, director general of the Research Council. The fields range from population studies and nanowires to cosmology-­what governs the development of the universe. Several projects target the human body and how it functions when it is in good and poor health. Some of the teams are creating and developing research methods, such as x-ray lasers and the use of mathematic analyses, vital methodologies that will benefit multiple research fields.


Commitment to strong research environments

The aim of this commitment to strong research teams is to bolster cutting-edge research in Sweden. An important argument is that Sweden must be capable of meeting the challenge of pursuing research of ever greater complexity and requiring ever greater resources, while international competition for the best researchers continues to stiffen.

Several other government financiers­-Formas (the Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences, and Spatial Planning), the Foundation for Strategic Research, and VINNOVA (the Swedish Agency for Innovation Systems)­-are making similar commitments.

More information:

More information (in Swedish) regarding the respective research environments, participating researchers, lists, award rationales, and the make-up of the panel can be found at: www.vr.se/starka.

The ten research teams are:

  • X-ray Free-Electron Lasers in Structural Biology. Contact: Janos Hajdu, Uppsala University, phone: +46 18-471 44 49
  • The Gothenburg Stochastic Center. Contact: Peter Jagers, Chalmers University of Technology, phone: +46 31-772 35 20
  • Context, Competence and Combinatorial Signaling in Vertebrate Development. Contact: Carlos Ibánez, Karolinska Institute, phone: +46 8-52 48 76 60
  • Center for Population Studies. A strong and innovative research center at Umeå University. Contact: Anders Brändström, phone: +46 90- 786 60 63, Umeå University
  • The AlbaNova High Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology (HEAC) Center. Contact: Claes Fransson, Stockholm University, phone: +46 8-55 37 85 17
  • Brain Neurodegeneration, Plasticity and Repair. Contact: Patrik Brundin, Lund University, phone: +46 46-222 05 29
  • Mitochondrial Medicine Center. Contact: Nils-Göran Larsson, Karolinska Institute, phone: +46 8-58 58 37 24
  • Evolutionary Genomics - Crossing the Prokaryote-Eukaryote Boundary. Contacts: Siv Andersson, Uppsala University, phone: +46 18-471 43 79 and Hans Ellegren
  • Nanowires for Fundamental Materials Science and Quantum Physics and for Applications in Electronics, Photonics and in Life-sciences. Contact: Lars Samuelson, Lund University, phone:+46 46-222 76 79
  • Betula: Memory, Genetics, Brain Imaging and Early Diagnostics. Contact: Lars-Göran Nilsson, Stockholm University, phone: +46 8-16 39 40

Tina Zethraeus | alfa
Further information:
http://www.vr.se

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Waste in the water – New purification techniques for healthier aquatic ecosystems
24.07.2018 | Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

nachricht Plenty of habitat for bears in Europe
24.07.2018 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

Im Focus: Lining up surprising behaviors of superconductor with one of the world's strongest magnets

Scientists have discovered that the electrical resistance of a copper-oxide compound depends on the magnetic field in a very unusual way -- a finding that could help direct the search for materials that can perfectly conduct electricity at room temperatur

What happens when really powerful magnets--capable of producing magnetic fields nearly two million times stronger than Earth's--are applied to materials that...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

2018 Work Research Conference

25.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

15.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Diving robots find Antarctic winter seas exhale surprising amounts of carbon dioxide

15.08.2018 | Earth Sciences

Early opaque universe linked to galaxy scarcity

15.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>