Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

ThruVision wins Grand Security Product Award 2008

20.11.2008
ThruVision’s non-invasive security screening system wins ‘Best of what’s new 2008’ security award

An innovative security screening system from ThruVision, that can detect hidden explosives, liquids, narcotics, weapons, plastics and ceramics from a distance, has received the grand security product award in the ‘Best of what’s new 2008’ by the US Magazine ‘Popular Science’.

Called the T5000, the system forms images of metallic and non-metallic threat or contraband objects concealed under clothing out to distances of 25m. It was developed by UK security equipment manufacturer ThruVision Ltd, a spin out company of the Science and Technology Facilities Council.

Like all ThruVision products, the T5000 was developed to address personal privacy concerns now being raised in connection with the use of security imaging technologies. The T5000 avoids many of the acceptability issues associated with the use of imaging technologies in the public domain by non-intrusively detecting a wide range of contraband objects such as weapons, explosives, liquids and narcotics on walking or stationary people at various distances. Importantly the T5000 does this without revealing anatomical detail, thereby preserving the privacy of the subject. Concealed objects are shown against a silhouette of the human form.

The T5000 is also safe; it forms images of concealed objects by receiving natural low energy waves produced by people and their surroundings. Unlike an X-ray camera, the T5000 does not emit dangerous ionizing radiation so there is no threat to the operators or people being screened.

Clive Beattie, ThruVision CEO, said “We are very pleased and honoured to have received this award from Popular Science. The recent European Parliamentary decision to further study the health and human rights implications of full body scanners before their deployment in EU airports highlights the importance of all our products’ safety and privacy-related attributes. The ability to non-invasively screen for concealed objects at a distance offers a significant advantage to security system operators for applications including border and access control, counter-terrorism and asset protection.”

ThruVision’s passive imaging technology originally stems from research carried out at the Science and Technology Facilities Council’s Rutherford Appleton Laboratory to study dying stars. Dr Liz Towns Andrews, Director of Knowledge Exchange at STFC said: “This award is well-deserved recognition for ThruVision. STFC is totally committed to using its research facilities and scientific expertise to support and develop such innovative enterprises, so I’d like to congratulate ThruVision on this achievement.”

Wendy Taylor MCIPR | alfa
Further information:
http://www.dl.ac.uk

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Success at leading conference on silicon materials science and technology in Japan
13.12.2018 | IHP - Leibniz-Institut für innovative Mikroelektronik

nachricht Ultrasound Connects
13.11.2018 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New megalibrary approach proves useful for the rapid discovery of new materials

Northwestern discovery tool is thousands of times faster than conventional screening methods

Different eras of civilization are defined by the discovery of new materials, as new materials drive new capabilities. And yet, identifying the best material...

Im Focus: Data storage using individual molecules

Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal ‘small’, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Around the world, researchers are attempting to shrink data storage devices to achieve as large a storage capacity in as small a space as possible. In almost...

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

New megalibrary approach proves useful for the rapid discovery of new materials

19.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

Artificial intelligence meets materials science

19.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

Gut microbiome regulates the intestinal immune system, researchers find

19.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>