Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Andrea Ablasser receives prize for junior scientists

24.10.2013
Immunologist awarded with Jürgen Wehland Prize

Dr Andrea Ablasser, scientist at the University of Bonn, is the winner of this year’s Jürgen Wehland Prize. She receives the award in recognition of her outstanding research on mechanisms of pathogen recognition by the innate immune system.

The ceremony takes on 24 October during the fourth “North Regio Day on Infection” symposium, short NoRDI IV, at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research.

How does the immune system recognise pathogens? Which steps are triggered by the immune response to combat them? How does the immune system differentiate between “hazardous” and “useful” invaders? These questions have been addressed by researchers for years now. Finding answers, however, is not straightforward, as both hazardous and useful structures consist largely of the same molecules which are recognised by the innate immune system. Differentiating between them, however, is essential for the immune system as it has to decide which invaders have to be fought off and which have to remain untouched.

Only in the past few years researchers have discovered that the identification of viruses by the innate immune system is mainly based on detecting viral nucleic acids, the building blocks of their genetic information. Andrea Ablasser and her colleagues were able to identify new receptors and regulatory molecules which are activated in virus-infected as well as in neighbouring uninfected cells. Those are crucial for establishing an anti-viral immune response. “Our long-term goal is to use the knowledge we gained to treat diseases. One way to achieve this is to develop specific antagonists, which could be used in immunotherapy”, says Ablasser. Antagonists inhibit molecules or pathogens without provoking a biological response themselves.

On the way towards this aim the Jürgen Wehland Prize is a great honour for her. “I feel grateful and am really delighted to receive this award. It is great recognition of my previous scientific achievements and motivates me for the future”, says the awardee. The prize is endowed with 5000 Euro and was established by the HZI in memory of the former Scientific Director Jürgen Wehland.

Andrea Ablasser studied human medicine at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU), at the Universidad Miguel Hernandes de Eiche Alicante, Spain, and at Harvard Medical School, USA. In 2008 she completed her studies as one of the ten best students in Germany. Currently, she is a junior group leader at the University of Bonn.

Rebecca Winkels | Helmholtz-Zentrum
Further information:
http://www.helmholtz-hzi.de/en/news_events/news/view/article/complete/andrea_ablasser_receives_prize_for_junior_scientists/

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht LandKlif: Changing Ecosystems
06.07.2018 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht “Future of Composites in Transportation 2018”, JEC Innovation Award for hybrid roof bow
29.06.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Metal too 'gummy' to cut? Draw on it with a Sharpie or glue stick, science says

19.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

NSF-supported researchers to present new results on hurricanes and other extreme events

19.07.2018 | Earth Sciences

Scientists uncover the role of a protein in production & survival of myelin-forming cells

19.07.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>