Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The micro sociology of discrimination: overseas nurses’ experiences

27.04.2006


New research by Dr John Aggergaard Larsen, Research Fellow at the European Institute of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey suggests that overseas-trained nurses working in the UK experience racist or xenophobic discrimination that often works through subtle ‘little things’ occurring in everyday interaction. The research, which is based on in-depth interviews across England and Wales, and was presented at the BSA Conference 2006 on 22 April 2006, reveals that this can have severe consequences for the life and well-being of the nurses, as it can also impede their career development chances.



Overseas nurses may feel bullied or socially isolated at work. In the research some nurses described how they are always given the jobs performed in solitude, they are confined to sitting by themselves during breaks or patients and relatives avoid approaching them, preferring the white healthcare assistant. Furthermore, overseas nurses feel frequently singled out for negative attention when colleagues make a formal complaint over minor issues that generally go unnoticed if performed by a British colleague.

The career development for overseas nurses can be seriously hindered by the social marginalisation they experience. Rather than actively being treated badly, some report how they see their British colleagues being supported and advised by clinical managers who allow them to ‘act up’ to a higher position or brief or train them before a promotion interview. This unequal treatment means that overseas nurses are in a disadvantaged position in the workplace.


Our research shows that some overseas nurse react to this everyday discrimination by retracting from previous career ambitions and instead concentrate on their family lives. Some successful overseas nurses have, in contrast, described how they actively seek to overcome such difficult social situations through a self-imposed ‘blindness’ to the discrimination of their social surroundings and a strong social skill to re-negotiate their social role, often through humour.

These findings point to the importance of paying attention to the micro sociology of discrimination as it occurs in the everyday of healthcare practice. Apart from disadvantaging migrant workers such processes means that valuable skills and competencies are lost, as individuals are not using and developing their full potential to the benefit of British healthcare provision. Employers and managers should therefore pay more attention to support migrant workers and put a stop to the everyday discrimination.

Dr John Aggergaard Larsen is part of the wider REOH research team: Professor Pam Smith and Dr Helen Allen (Centre for Research in Nursing and Midwifery Education, University of Surrey), Professor Maureen Mackintosh and Dr Leroi Henry (Economics, Open University) and The Royal College of Nursing. The research is funded by the European Social Fund.

Stuart Miller | alfa
Further information:
http://portal.surrey.ac.uk/reoh

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

'On-off switch' brings researchers a step closer to potential HIV vaccine

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Penn studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsies

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

An LED-based device for imaging radiation induced skin damage

30.03.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>