Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe” Sets up Four New Junior Research Groups

16.05.2013
Young researchers examine topics such as war crimes tribunals and the Pentecostal movement

The Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” of Heidelberg University has set up four new junior research groups. The group leaders and their at least two doctoral students each investigate the topics of war crimes tribunals, the Pentecostal movement, alternative agriculture and Islam in Asia.

The common concern of the different projects is to examine the exchange processes between cultures and thereby make a considerable contribution to the new research approach of transculturality. The junior research groups will receive Excellence Initiative funding for three years to start with, with the option of extension by another year and a half.

Dr. Kerstin von Lingen is heading the junior research group on war crimes tribunals. The aim of her research programme is to highlight the links between different tribunals in Europe and Asia after 1945. Consequently, she and her doctoral students are examining national war crimes tribunals in East Asia, particularly the Tokyo Trial, as well as trials in Indonesia (Netherlands), Indochina (France), China and the Soviet Union.
All projects in the group also deal with the work of the United Nations War Crimes Commission in London and Chongking. Kerstin von Lingen studied history and Italian in Freiburg and Milan and received her doctorate in Tübingen with a thesis on British war crime policy after 1945 and the trial against Albert Kesselring 1947 in Venice. From 2010 to 2013 she already taught in the Graduate Programme for Transcultural Studies of the Heidelberg Cluster of Excellence.

The junior research group headed by Dr. Katja Rakow on the Pentecostal movement will deal with the presence and growth of this Christian movement in Singapore. She and her team are investigating the question of how the global phenomenon of Pentecostalism has established itself and developed in the multi-ethnic, multi-religious and authoritarian city state in Asia. Katja Rakow graduated in religious studies, anthropology and sociology in Berlin. In Heidelberg she did her doctorate with a thesis on the transformation of Buddhist inspired ideas and practices in a transcultural perspective.

Anthropologist Dr. Daniel Münster heads the interdisciplinary junior research group on issues around alternative agriculture. Along with his doctoral students he is focusing on how small-holder farmers in South Asia respond to the challenges of globalised agriculture by experimenting with forward-looking new technologies from Europe and developing new practices themselves. He thus intends to widen the scope of research on developing countries, which traditionally concentrates on crises and extreme poverty, by focusing on the aspects of creativity and inventiveness. Daniel Münster studied anthropology, religious studies and intercultural communication in Mexico, the USA and Munich, where he then did his doctorate with a thesis on postcolonial perspectives on village traditions in South India. He was a lecture at the University of Halle-Wittenberg before assuming this new position.

A fourth junior research group is to be established in summer 2013. It will deal with developments of Islam in Asia, thus outside the Arab world. Junior research groups offer young researchers the opportunity to direct their own independent research projects early in their career and to supervise their first doctoral students. So far eight junior research groups have been established at the Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe”, with a total of about 20 doctoral students. Further information is available at www.asia-europe.uni-heidelberg.de.

Contact
Dr. Alexander Häntzschel
Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context”
Phone: +49 6221 54-4008
press@asia-europe.uni-heidelberg.de

Communications and Marketing
Press Office, phone: +49 6221 54-2311
presse@rektorat.uni-heidelberg.de

Marietta Fuhrmann-Koch | idw
Further information:
http://www.uni-heidelberg.de

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht Classroom in Stuttgart with Li-Fi of Fraunhofer HHI opened
03.11.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Nachrichtentechnik, Heinrich-Hertz-Institut, HHI

nachricht Starting school boosts development
11.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

Im Focus: Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

Rice University researchers test 3-D carbon nanostructures' thermal transport abilities

Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA detects solar flare pulses at Sun and Earth

17.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

NIST scientists discover how to switch liver cancer cell growth from 2-D to 3-D structures

17.11.2017 | Health and Medicine

The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change

17.11.2017 | Studies and Analyses

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>