Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

European Research Agencies Create Sustainable Entity for Astroparticle Physics

04.12.2012
European funding agencies for astroparticle physics celebrate today the successful work of the ASPERA European funded network and the launch of the newly founded APPEC, the Astroparticle Physics European Consortium.
Over the last six years, ASPERA brought together funding agencies and the physics community to set up coordination for astroparticle physics at the European level. The main achievement of ASPERA is the development of the European strategy for astroparticle physics defining the priority large infrastructures needed to solve some of the deepest mysteries of the Universe. ASPERA also developed activities stimulating the field such as R&D common calls and created closer relationships to Industry and other research fields.

APPEC will now take over and aims at developing a European common action plan to fund the upcoming large astroparticle physics infrastructures as defined in the ASPERA Roadmap. 10 countries already joined the new APPEC consortium and 9 additional countries are following the accession process. APPEC’s activities will be organised through three functional centers located at DESY in Hamburg - Germany, APC laboratory of CNRS/CEA in Paris – France and INFN national underground laboratory in Gran Sasso – Italy.

The meeting was the opportunity for the very first General Assembly of APPEC during which Stavros Katsanevas from CNRS – France was elected as its Chairman, and Thomas Berghoefer from DESY – Germany was elected as its General Secretary.

“I’m very honored to have been elected to chair the new APPEC consortium. APPEC’s focus will be to enhance European collaboration and coordination in funding to strengthen astroparticle physics in Europe and keep the leading role of Europe in understanding the secrets of the Universe”, Stavros Katsanevas said.

“ASPERA was really a great success leading to the new APPEC structure. Implementing our large astroparticle physics infrastructures is a big challenge and it is a very good sign that 10 countries already joined to make a bright future possible.” Thomas Berghoefer said.

What is the nature of dark matter and of dark energy? Where do cosmic rays come from? What is the view of the sky at extreme energies? What is the role of neutrinos in cosmic evolution? Can we detect gravitational waves? To answer such kinds of questions, astroparticle physics develops specially designed particle detectors, telescopes and experiments at the frontier of astrophysics, particle physics and cosmology.

Website: www.aspera-eu.org

Contact:
ASPERA press officer - CERN
Arnaud Marsollier
arnaud.marsollier@cern.ch
+41 22 767 37 09

Available pictures for press: http://s.aspera-eu.org/PressPictures

* Note for editors:

APPEC is the Astroparticle Physics European Consortium. It comprises 10 countries represented by their Ministries, funding agencies or their designated institution: Belgium (FWO), Croatia (HRZZ), France (CEA, CNRS), Germany (DESY), Ireland (RIA), Italy (INFN), The Netherlands (FOM), Poland (NCN), Romania (IFIN), UK (STFC).

ASPERA, the AStroParticle European Research Area is a network of European national funding agencies responsible for astroparticle physics. ASPERA is funded by the European Commission as an ERA­NET. ASPERA comprises currently 23 national funding agencies in 19 countries, and CERN European Organization.

Arnaud Marsollier | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.cern.ch
http://www.aspera-eu.org

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'
23.02.2017 | University of Wisconsin-Madison

nachricht Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars
22.02.2017 | Carnegie Institution for Science

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>