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Climate change poker: The barriers which are preventing a global agreement

06.08.2009
As the world's environment ministers, government officials, diplomats and campaigners prepare to attend the COP15 conference in Copenhagen in December 2009 to unite in the battle against climate change in one of the most complicated political deals the world has ever seen, the increasingly complex territory of climate negotiations is being revealed in an article published today, 5 August, 2009, in IOP Publishing's Environmental Research Letters.

The paper 'Tripping Points: Barriers and Bargaining Chips on the Road to Copenhagen' lays bare the main tripping points – political barriers and bargaining chips – which need to be overcome for countries to reach a consensus on how to address global climate change.

One of the key issues delegates will face in their attempt to agree on mitigation, is that what some countries see as barriers, others perceive as bargaining chips. While many developed countries, including the UK, favor extending mitigation actions to some developing countries, many developing countries will be using finance and technology transfer as a deal breaker for their consent to the overall deal.

Bargaining is expected to evolve around what is referred to as the 'chicken and egg question', that is whether actions depend on financing, or financing on actions. Researchers predict that similar to a poker game, countries will be delaying decisions until the last hours of the conference when all the bargaining chips will be on the table and parties cannot wait any longer to see who will show their hand first.

Other barriers delegates will face in their bid to reach an agreement on a post-2012 framework are issues evolving around the reduction of emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, and how to implement adaptation to climate change.

Even if some consensus is reached in Copenhagen, there is however no guarantee a deal will be agreed on. Nevertheless, the researchers write "Regardless, however, of the perspective from which one frames the discussions, success in Copenhagen and beyond will depend on parties' ability to negotiate past the tripping points […] by finding ways to match barriers with bargaining chips in envisioning how the details of any future agreement can be hammered out in the months and years to come."

Lena Weber | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.iop.org

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