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It’s Time to Put Potatoes Back on the Table

26.04.2011
Hungry for a meatloaf cupcake with mashed potato frosting? How about potato tacos? Or a loaded baked potato pizza? With the popularity of low-carb diets waning, potato-based dishes are turning up on more dinner tables and restaurant menus as a healthy addition to almost any meal.

The “Ingredients” column of the April 2011 issue of Food Technology magazine, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), examines the history of the spud as well as some of the innovative ways it can be prepared and new products on the market that showcase the healthy advantages of potatoes.

“Compared by some to a blank slate, potatoes can effectively work with a wide range of different flavors and ingredients,” writes author Donald E. Pszczola, senior editor of Food Technology and author of the magazine’s “Ingredients” column.

Potatoes are the world’s fourth most-important food crop behind wheat, maize and rice. World production exceeded 325 million metric tons in 2007. Although the United States produces just 28 percent of the world’s mass of potatoes, it is one of the largest potato consumers in the world at 126 pounds per capita.

Pszczola found in researching his column that potatoes are appearing on menus in a variety of dishes.

Some of the more innovative include:

Lime Chicken Potato Tacos, which are less than 250 calories and 7g of fat per serving. Adding potatoes increases potassium and vitamin C without sodium, fat or cholesterol.

Creamy Potato Leek Soup with Tangy Tarragon Drizzle, the winning recipe from the U.S. Potato Board’s “See Your Spuds in the Spotlight” recipe contest.

Mediterranean-inspired cuisine such as Salad with Potato Medley, Potato Crusted Goat Cheese, Potato Risotto, Potato Chips Strips, Gnocchi Tart with Purple Potato Puree and Caramelized Cauliflower and Potato Soup.

Information from this press release used for online, print, or broadcast content must be attributed to Food Technology magazine, a publication of the Institute of Food Technologists. Read the full article: http://www.ift.org/food-technology/past-issues/2011/april/columns/ingredients.aspx

About IFT
The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) is a nonprofit scientific society. Our individual members are professionals engaged in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT’s mission is to advance the science of food, and our long-range vision is to ensure a safe and abundant food supply, contributing to healthier people everywhere.

For more than 70 years, the IFT has been unlocking the potential of the food science community by creating a dynamic global forum where members from more than 100 countries can share, learn, and grow. We champion the use of sound science across the food value chain through the exchange of knowledge, by providing education, and by furthering the advancement of the profession. IFT has offices in Chicago, Illinois and Washington, D.C. For more information, please visit ift.org.

Mindy Weinstein | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.ift.org

Further reports about: Food Chain Plus IfT food science information technology potato

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