Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Underground air might cause DNA damage

Our everyday environments are full of airborne particles that are harmful to varying degrees when inhaled. Particularly damaging to our cellular DNA are the particles from the underground system in Stockholm, Sweden, according to a new doctoral thesis from Karolinska Institutet.

“Luckily, most of them do not remain in the underground for any length of time,” says scientist Hanna Karlsson. “However, particle levels are often very high. My results show that there is every reason to speed up the work being done to clean the air in the underground.”

Every year, some 5,300 Swedes die premature deaths from inhaling the microscopic particles of coal, asphalt, iron and other materials that pollute the city’s air. These particles, which are the result of incomplete combustion, road surface attrition, etc. could be reduced if the right steps were taken; the problem is that it is not known which particle sources pose the greatest threat to human health.

To build up a picture of which particles are the most harmful, Dr Karlsson has compared how particles from a variety of sources affect cultured lung cells. The results, which are presented in her thesis Particularly harmful particles show that particles from the Stockholm underground are much more damaging to cellular DNA than the other sources tested (e.g. wood smoke and cars).

The airborne particles in the underground system largely comprise iron, and are formed by the abrasion of the train wheels against the rails. The damage is caused when these particles enter the body and form free radicals in the body’s cells. Free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can prove harmful to the cell’s DNA; although such damage can often be repaired by the cell, it can sometime remains untreated, and this increases the risk of cancer.

Another type of particle that stood out in the studies was that caused by the friction between car tyres and the road surface. The report shows that these particles trigger a powerful inflammatory response (i.e. a general defence reaction in the body). Levels of these particles are particularly high in the spring, when road surfaces dry out and cars are still fitted with studded winter tyres.

“It’s a serious problem, as these particles exist in large concentrations in environments that people remain in for long periods,” says Dr Karlsson.

Apart from particles from the underground and the roads, the study also examined those released by the combustion of wood, pellets and diesel. None of the other types of particle tested were totally harmless. Modern wood- and pellet-burning boilers gave off much fewer emissions than old ones, but the particles produced were no less harmful.

Katarina Sternudd | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Indian roadside refuse fires produce toxic rainbow
26.10.2016 | Duke University

nachricht Inflammation Triggers Unsustainable Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infection
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

3-D-printed structures shrink when heated

26.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

Indian roadside refuse fires produce toxic rainbow

26.10.2016 | Health and Medicine

First results of NSTX-U research operations

26.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

More VideoLinks >>>