Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Dentists report on new computerized tomography systems


Discuss uses for diagnosing oral health problems

Cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) increasingly has become the newest technology for orthodontists to use in diagnosing complicated oral health problems.

Reporting on four new CBCT systems in the December issue of the Journal of Orthodontics are J. Martin Palomo and Mark Hans from the department of orthodontics at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and C.H. Kau and S. Richmond from the department of dental health and biological sciences at the University of Wales’ College of Medicine.

"The long awaited incorporation of the third dimension to our radiographic records is now a reality," the researchers said, adding "There is still room for improvements; however the CBCT technology appears to be here to stay."

What started as a prototype for CT imaging in 1967 has evolved into a sixth generation, with better and more focused images and lower radiation exposure for patients. The first generation scanners gave slice-by-slice images. The newest generation of the CBCT scanners sweeps the head and face and provides multiple stacks of images to give a full head view of the bone and tissue structures in three dimensions.

Current available CBCT scanners are: the NewTom 3G from Quantitative Radiology of Verona, Italy; the i-CAT from Imaging Sciences International, from the United States; CB MercuRay from Hitachi Medical Corporation from Japan; and the 3D Accuitomo from J. Morita Mfg Corporation, also from Japan.

What are the benefits of this new technology and their applications to orthodontics? The researchers report:

  • The technology generates a wide range of images of the head, teeth and airways in under one minute, reducing radiation exposure to 20 % of convention CT imaging systems.
  • The images taken with CBCT technologies are so swift that they can capture a heart beat.
  • The technology adheres to radiation-level guidelines provided by the American Dental Association and the British Orthodontic Society to use techniques that reduce exposure to radiation.
  • The new 3-D images captures pictures of hard tissues and most soft tissues components, except the color texture of the skin’s surface, enabling orthodontists to detect higher incidences of oral abnormalities such as oral cysts and buried teeth.
  • The improved images allow for better airway analyses and management of conditions related to sleep apnea and enlarged adenoids.
  • Images from the CBCT technology have additional applications in other specialties of dentistry such as in placing new implants that are increasingly used in place of dentures, remedial efforts for TMJ and for reconstruction of cleft palates and lips.

The researchers report, "The future in orthodontic imaging seems exciting as we discover new frontiers, and as the paradigm in dentistry shifts from landmarks, lines, distances and angles to surfaces, areas and volumes." They also added that "Orthodontists are beginning to appreciate the advantages that the third dimension gives to clinical diagnosis, treatment planning and patient education."

Susan Griffith | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht NIH scientists describe potential antibody treatment for multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae
14.03.2018 | NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

nachricht Researchers identify key step in viral replication
13.03.2018 | University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

Oceans formed before Tharsis and evolved together, shaping climate history of Mars

A new scenario seeking to explain how Mars' putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million...

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

Im Focus: Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System

Data collected on ocean-ice interactions in the little-researched regions of the far south

The world’s second-largest ice shelf was the destination for a Polarstern expedition that ended in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14th March 2018. Oceanographers from...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

Physicists made crystal lattice from polaritons

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Thawing permafrost produces more methane than expected

20.03.2018 | Earth Sciences

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>