Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New system for the analysis of facial movement in three dimensions

08.03.2005


Navarre University Hospital has launched a novel system for capturing facial movement that enables such movement to be monitored and quantified in a precise manner.

The device, designed by STT Engineering & Systems of Donostia-San Sebastian and adapted for use by the Plastic Surgery service at the Hospital for facial applications, has received the 2004 Award in the Innovative Projects Competition for Young Entrepreneurs for Transference of Research Results (Ideactiva Gaztempresa).

The device captures and quantifies facial movement in three dimensions by means of three infrared cameras and software that processes facial movements before and after reconstruction. In this way, an exact method for measuring and evaluating the various parameters has been devised: angles, the speed of the spreading movement by facial muscles at the corners of the mouth, etc. Moreover, apart from analysing the outcome of surgery, this image-capturing system for facial movements also helps in programming the actual surgical operation.



The parameters for the angle and the spreading movement of the risorious muscle that provokes the normal smile are chosen. On carrying out the muscular transplant, the surgeons have to follow the criteria calculated for the facial parameters in such a way that symmetry is established with the healthy side of the face. All this data is studied with this device and provides information for planning the treatment.

Apart from its clinical application, this system provides a highly important tool in the legal field. It can be used as very useful tool in investigations to quantify damage caused by workplace and traffic accidents, given that the degree of injury and muscular contraction can be quantified objectively and with exactitude.

Facial paralysis

Facial Paralysis is a relatively frequent pathology (each year there are nine new cases per 100,000 inhabitants), its origin being diverse such as, for example, obstetric, congenital, pharmacological, auto-immune, traumatic, surgical, and so on.

Its surgical repair treatment can be carried out by static or dynamic techniques. A static technique is suitable for patients over 70. In general it consists of re-suspending the fallen part of the face with the patient’s own tendons or aloplastic material. The patient cannot move the face but has the benefit of very acceptable results in rest mode situations as well as improving nasal respiration, ocular closing and buccal closing.

Novel microsurgical programme

Since Navarre University Hospital designed this novel therapeutic microsurgical programme for treating facial paralysis through dynamic techniques with cruciate facial inserts and muscle transplants, some fifty patients have been treated, the largest series in the state. If the face muscles have been enervated due to the injury, their movement may be recovered over a period of two years maximum, without atrophying. If more time transpires, the facial musculature atrophies and other reconstruction techniques are necessary. Over periods less than 24 months nerve transfers of the healthy contralateral facial nerve are used by means of nerve inserts. With this system, the patient can move the face at will.

Facial paralysis frequently lasts for more than two years and, thus, healthy facial musculature does not exist. In these cases new techniques are applied. These involve the implanting into the face of a muscle from another part of the body. Normally the leg recto interno or the wide dorsal muscle is used as these have considerable contractile power and achieve a highly acceptable spreading movement at the mouth corners. The patient may move her or his face spontaneously with highly acceptable symmetry, despite having been affected by the paralysis over a long period.

Garazi Andonegi | alfa
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Vanishing capillaries
23.03.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht How prenatal maternal infections may affect genetic factors in Autism spectrum disorder
22.03.2017 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

When Air is in Short Supply - Shedding light on plant stress reactions when oxygen runs short

23.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics

23.03.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles

23.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>