Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

NYC Mosquito Pesticide Spraying Did Not Increase Asthma Treatments

02.08.2004


New York City’s late summer/early fall 2000 mosquito spraying session, designed as an effort to minimize the spread of West Nile virus, did not increase the number of people seeking emergency care for asthma-related problems, according to a study published today in the August issue of the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP). The study found no correlation between the application of sumithrin—a pyrethroid pesticide—in the 162 residential zip codes sprayed between July and September 2000 and asthma-related symptom cases presenting at the city’s 11 public hospital emergency departments.

Researchers evaluated rates of emergency department visits over a 14-month period. The study also incorporated air quality data, including daily measures of ozone, air particulates, and temperature, which can cause fluctuations in the number of people seeking treatment for asthma. .All zip codes in New York City were included in the study, except those in Staten Island, which lacks a public hospital.

The number of visits was similar in the 3-day periods before and after spraying. The researchers also looked specifically at incidents in children under 15 years and for aggravation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. No correlation to spraying was found in either group.



Earlier studies have found that short-term exposure to pyrethroid insecticides can cause symptoms including wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. Evidence also suggests that pyrethroid pesticides may aggravate preexisting respiratory conditions in some people. This study is the first population study to look at the impact of a spraying program in residential areas.

The study did not seek to address the relationship between pyrethroid pesticides and asthma symptoms. The absence of an increase in asthma treatments was attributed to the pesticide application program as a whole. The program included public announcements on radio, television, and print media 48 hours before spraying was conducted, which may have resulted in people with sensitivities closing their windows or taking medication as a precaution. In another measure to minimize public exposure to the pesticide used, spraying began at 10 p.m. and ended by 5 a.m.

“As the circulation of West Nile virus and the emergence of associated illness increases in the United States, public health agencies are increasingly called on to make risk-benefit calculations regarding vector control programs,” the study authors write. “Our results suggest that modest to large increases in emergency department visits for asthma did not occur in New York City during and after pyrethroid spraying for West Nile virus control in 2000.”

“Working to stop the spread of encephalitis caused by West Nile virus is increasingly important to communities across the United States,” said Dr. Jim Burkhart, science editor for EHP. “It seems that the New York City program was well constructed to minimize the impact on those with asthma and related respiratory conditions.”

The lead author of the study was Adam M. Karpati of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Other authors were Mary C. Perrin, Tom Matte, Jessica Leighton, Joel Schwartz, and R. Graham Barr. The article is available free of charge at http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/docs/2004/6946/abstract.html

EHP is published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. EHP became an Open Access journal in January 2004.

| newswise
Further information:
http://www.ehponline.org
http://www.niehs.nih.gov

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht The end of pneumonia? New vaccine offers hope
23.10.2017 | University at Buffalo

nachricht Scientists track ovarian cancers to site of origin: Fallopian tubes
23.10.2017 | Johns Hopkins Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Salmonella as a tumour medication

HZI researchers developed a bacterial strain that can be used in cancer therapy

Salmonellae are dangerous pathogens that enter the body via contaminated food and can cause severe infections. But these bacteria are also known to target...

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Symposium on Driving Simulation

23.10.2017 | Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microfluidics probe 'cholesterol' of the oil industry

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Gamma rays will reach beyond the limits of light

23.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

The end of pneumonia? New vaccine offers hope

23.10.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>