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NAMS issues first comprehensive recommendations on care of women at menopause and beyond

17.09.2014

The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) has published its key, evidence-based recommendations for the comprehensive care of midlife women—on everything from hot flashes to heart disease.

The special feature, "The North American Menopause Society Recommendations for Clinical Care of Midlife Women," was published online today in the Society's journal Menopause. This is the first, comprehensive set of evidence-based recommendations for the care of midlife women freely available to all clinicians who care for women at this stage of life.

"Given the significant controversy and new research findings related to hormone therapy and other treatments for midlife women, this guide is greatly needed," says Dr. Jan Shifren, president of NAMS and a practicing gynecologist. "This succinct and evidence-based guide to clinical care will improve the understanding and management of women's health at this critical stage of life."

The key points and clinical recommendations, which are graded for their level of evidence, were carefully reviewed for accuracy and relevance, edited, and approved by an editorial panel of experts in midlife women's health from a wide range of specialties, including gynecologists, internists, medical and reproductive endocrinologists, cardiologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, dermatologists, oncologists and counselors. The 2013-2014 NAMS Board of Trustees provided a final review and approval of the key points and recommendations.

"This very practical publication includes key points and recommendations for care on more than 50 important topics, including such key issues as vasomotor symptoms, osteoporosis and genitourinary syndrome of menopause," states Dr. Margery Gass, executive director of NAMS.

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The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) started a revolution 25 years ago in the care of women at menopause and beyond, giving menopause care the focus it deserved in clinical practice and putting the standards of care for midlife and older women on solid scientific ground. To further the Society's mission, which is to promote the health and quality of life of all women during midlife and beyond, NAMS is making this valuable resource freely available to clinicians and women through the NAMS website, a trusted resource for both clinicians and patients. Go to http://www.menopause.org/clinrecs.

Founded in 1989, The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) is North America's leading nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting the health and quality of life of all women during midlife and beyond through an understanding of menopause and healthy aging. Its multidisciplinary membership of 2,000 leaders in the field—including clinical and basic science experts from medicine, nursing, sociology, psychology, nutrition, anthropology, epidemiology, pharmacy, and education—makes NAMS uniquely qualified to serve as the definitive resource for health professionals and the public for accurate, unbiased information about menopause and healthy aging. To learn more about NAMS, visit http://www.menopause.org

Eileen Petridis | Eurek Alert!

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