Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

MicroRNAs: A potential new frontier for medicine

24.03.2011
Noted experts explore this topic in the April issue of Translational Research

Since their discovery in the 1990s, microRNAs have proven to play a complex role in normal and abnormal functioning of many organ systems. In the April issue of Translational Research, entitled "MicroRNAs: A Potential New Frontier for Medicine," an international group of medical experts explores several themes related to our current understanding of microRNAs and the role they may play in the future of medicine.

A commentary by Monty Montano, Department of Medicine, Boston University, provides a general introduction to this single-topic issue. He states, "In the coming years, there is much to be learned about adaptive (and maladaptive) states by examining how the expression of miRNAs is influenced by the genetic architecture of miR genes, clusters, and mirtrons, as well as miRNA polymorphism and polymorphism in their mRNA targets…Current efforts to leverage knowledge of this regulatory system to diagnose, track, and attenuate disease progression represent a major new research opportunity and challenge in this rapidly growing area of translational medicine."

KEY POINTS:

microRNA, a new paradigm for understanding immunoregulation, inflammation, and autoimmune diseases
Rujuan Dai, and S. Ansar Ahmed
The authors review in great detail the functions of microRNAs in autoimmune diseases, inflammation processes, and immune system regulation.
Integrating microRNAs into a system biology approach to acute lung injury
Tong Zhou, Joe G.N. Garcia and Wei Zhang
The authors explore the possible role of microRNAs in inflammatory lung diseases and integration into a comprehensive disease model for acute lung injury.
MicroRNAs in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
Kusum V. Pandit, Jadranka Milosevic and Naftali Kaminski
The authors summarize current knowledge on the role of microRNAs in idiopathic lung fibrosis (IPF), highlighting how differentially expressed microRNAs in IPF will have a significant impact on our understanding of the disease.
Involvement of microRNAs in lung cancer biology and therapy
Xi Liu, Lorenzo F. Sempere, Yongli Guo, Murray Korc, Sakari Kauppinen, Sarah J. Freemantle and Ethan Dmitrovsky

The authors review how microRNAs can accelerate or suppress lung cancers and how this knowledge might serve as a basis for developing diagnostic markers or anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

MicroRNA biomarkers in lung cancer: MiRacle or quagMiRe?
Sai Yendamuri and Robert Kratzke
The authors explore some of the difficulties facing the development of microRNAs as biomarkers for lung disease, as well as some promising areas of research.
MicroRNAs as therapeutic targets in cancer
S. Patrick Nana-Sinkam and Carlo M. Croce
The authors review the challenges of translating current knowledge on microRNAs into effective clinical therapies for many cancers or as adjuvants for enhancing chemosensitivity to traditional therapies.
MicroRNAs in cardiac disease
Gerald W. Dorn II
The author examines the use of microRNAs as both biomarkers of cardiac diseases and as potential targets for therapies.
MicroRNAs in kidney function and disease
Sanjeev Akkina and Bryan N. Becker
The authors review the role of microRNAs in understanding the pathophysiology of kidney disease and potential therapeutic uses.
microRNAs and liver disease
Thomas A. Kerr, Kevin M. Korenblat and Nicholas O. Davidson
The authors review developments in microRNA research in the areas of pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), viral hepatitis (C and B), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as well as the role of miRNAs as biomarkers of liver injury and HCC.
Diabetes mellitus, a microRNA-related disease?
Claudiane Guay, Elodie Roggli, Valeria Nesca, Cécile Jacovetti and Romano Regazzi

The authors review recent studies on the role of microRNAs in the pathogenesis of diabetes, including the role of several microRNAs in pancreatic beta cells and insulin-target tissues.

These articles appear in Translational Research, The Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, Volume 157, Issue 4 (April 2011) entitled "MicroRNAs: A Potential New Frontier for Medicine," published by Elsevier.

Pat Hogan | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.elsevier.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infections
23.05.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

nachricht Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat -- a key to better bone health
19.05.2017 | University of North Carolina Health Care

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>