Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Enhanced white blood cells heal mice with MS-like disease

03.06.2013
Genetically engineered immune cells seem to promote healing in mice infected with a neurological disease similar to multiple sclerosis (MS), cleaning up lesions and allowing the mice to regain use of their legs and tails.

The new finding, by a team of University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health researchers, suggests that immune cells could be engineered to create a new type of treatment for people with MS.

Currently, there are few good medications for MS, an autoimmune inflammatory disease that affects some 400,000 people in the United States, and none that reverse progress of the disease.

Dr. Michael Carrithers, assistant professor of neurology, led a team that created a specially designed macrophage – an immune cell whose name means "big eater." Macrophages rush to the site of an injury or infection, to destroy bacteria and viruses and clear away damaged tissue. The research team added a human gene to the mouse immune cell, creating a macrophage that expressed a sodium channel called NaVI.5, which seems to enhance the cell's immune response.

But because macrophages can also be part of the autoimmune response that damages the protective covering (myelin) of the nerves in people with MS, scientists weren't sure whether the NaV1.5 macrophages would help or make the disease worse.

When the mice developed experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis – the mouse version of MS -- they found that the NaV1.5 macrophages sought out the lesions caused by the disease and promoted recovery.

"This finding was unexpected because we weren't sure how much damage they would do, versus how much cleaning up they would do,'' Carrithers says. "Some people thought the mice would get more ill, but we found that it protected them and they either had no disease or a very mild case."

In follow-up experiments, regular mice that do not express the human gene were treated with the NaV1.5 macrophages after the onset of symptoms, which include weakness of the back and front limbs. The majority of these mice developed complete paralysis of their hindlimbs. Almost all of the mice that were treated with the Na1.5 macrophages regained the ability to walk. Mice treated with placebo solution or regular mouse macrophages that did not have NaV1.5 did not show any recovery or became more ill. In treated mice, the research team also found the NaV1.5 macrophages at the site of the lesions, and found smaller lesions and less damaged tissue in the treated mice.

Because the NaV1.5 variation is present in human immune cells, Carrithers says, "The questions are, 'Why are these repair mechanisms deficient in patients with MS and what can we do to enhance them?' '' He says the long-range goal is to develop the NaV1.5 enhanced macrophages as a treatment for people with MS.

Carrithers is a neurologist who treats patients with multiple sclerosis at University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics and the William S. Middleton Veterans' Hospital in Madison. His research team includes Kusha Rahgozar, Erik Wright and Lisette Carrithers. The research was supported by a prior National MS Society research grant and a current VA Merit Award from the Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development service of the Department of Veterans Affairs (7784115).

The study is being published in the June issue of the Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology

Susan Lampert Smith | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uwhealth.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

nachricht Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified
20.02.2017 | Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>