Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Derailing inner ear development

A molecule that regulates expression of two growth factors is critical for inner ear development

During mammalian neural development, cells extend projections to target tissues from which they derive growth factors needed for survival. Initially, neurons of the inner ear require brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) and neurotrophin 3 (Ntf3) from the otic placode, the sensory epithelium from which the cells are derived. Later, the cells express these growth factors themselves, which support the neurons that project to them.

Although this process is well known, the underlying molecular mechanisms have been unclear. Slitrk6, a transmembrane protein with structural similarities to the Slit family of axon guidance molecules and to the Ntrk neurotrophic factor receptors, is known to be expressed in the otic placode, and is therefore likely to play a role in inner ear development.

To investigate this, Kei-ichi Katayama of the RIKEN Brain Science Institute and his colleagues generated mice lacking the Slitrk6 gene. They found that the gross structure of the inner appeared normal1. However, they observed a significant reduction in the number of nerve fiber bundles projecting to the cochlea (Fig. 1). These defects were evident during late embryonic stages, and persisted throughout postnatal development. In the vestibular region, the defects were more severe, with nerve fibers bundles completely absent in this region in most mutant animals. In others, they were significantly reduced or had abnormal trajectories.

Next the researchers examined the spiral and vestibular ganglia, which contain neurons that project to the cochlea and vestibular region, respectively. Cell death was significantly higher in the mutants than in wild-type animals, so that the structures were up to 75% smaller than normal by the time of birth.

They also found that cultured sensory neurons from the spiral ganglion of mutant mice could grow projections towards sensory epithelial tissue from normal, but not mutant, mice. Further experiments revealed a mild but significant reduction in levels of Bdnf and Ntf-3 in the developing inner ear of the mutants. The phenotype of the mutant mice is therefore not due to axon guidance defects. Instead, these results suggest that Slitrk6 is part of a signaling pathway that increases expression of Bdnf and Ntf3 in the sensory epithelia.

“Behavioral tests show that the Slitrk6 knockout mice exhibit hearing loss,” says senior author Jun Aruga, “and we are now investigating whether they also have balance deficits. We believe our mutant mice are a good animal model of sensorineural deafness, which occurs because of improper cochlear development, following over-exposure to loud noises, and as a result of aging.”

The corresponding author for this highlight is based at the Laboratory for Behavioral and Developmental Disorders, RIKEN Brain Science Institute

Saeko Okada | Research asia research news
Further information:

Further reports about: Brain Derailing Ntf3 RIKEN inner ear molecular mechanism mutant mice nerve fiber

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Inflammation Triggers Unsustainable Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infection
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia
21.10.2016 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Etching Microstructures with Lasers

25.10.2016 | Process Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>