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Simply Evolutionary: Siemens Unveils New Technology for Nuclear Medicine’s

15.10.2007
The Siemens Medical Solutions Symbia E Series SPECT Imager Brings New Workflow and Imaging Benefits to Users in a Cost-Conscious Package Siemens Medical Solutions Molecular Imaging Division will address the needs of the cost-conscious consumer by redefining the quality of cost-efficient molecular imaging. At the 2007 European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) Annual Congress, held October 13-17 in Copenhagen, Denmark, Siemens will introduce the new Symbia E series single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager.

The Symbia E is the newest addition to the Symbia family of SPECT and SPECT•CT (computed tomography) imaging systems. It provides users with a high-quality SPECT imager that can lead to improved clinical confidence, reliability and versatility. “As the leader in molecular imaging innovations, Siemens is continually evaluating its product offerings to ensure that we help our global customers deliver the best outcomes while addressing their financial concerns,” said Michael Reitermann, president, Siemens Medical Solutions, Molecular Imaging Division.

The new Symbia E is based on the success of Siemens’ Symbia family of imagers. Based on state-of-the-art Symbia SPECT•CT technology and award-winning design, Symbia E leverages the strength of the industry’s leading gamma camera, the e.cam. There are more than 4,000 e.cams installed in more than 120 countries, proving that the system is an industry icon. Siemens has redesigned the e.cam structure with an improved chassis and improved electronics. The Symbia E boasts features that will allow providers to work with increased confidence because of the system’s improved image quality and increased reliability; these will lead to an accelerated workflow. The system is also versatile and it can be upgraded as a facility’s workload grows.

Siemens has taken the best detector technology that the Symbia family of SPECT and SPECT•CT imagers has to offer and made it available on Symbia E. A new generation of HD detector first introduced with the Symbia TruePoint SPECT•CT imager, with best in class performance and reliability is also included in the new Symbia E scanner. Using these new detectors, where Siemens achieved an 85 per cent reduction in wiring and a 75 per cent reduction in components, and Siemens’ own crystal material, the reliability of this new system is significantly increased. Symbia E also imports the clinically validated c.clear attenuation correction, which was developed on the Siemens c.cam dedicated cardiac scanner. So Symbia E users will take advantage of high-end cardiac scanning features.

To ensure the highest customer satisfaction and system uptime, the Symbia E is equipped with Siemens’ Remote Services capabilities. The Siemens Remote Services program enables Siemens to check the system status through full remote access and remote diagnostics. This level of proactive monitoring and trending of key performance indicators will allow Siemens to service and update the system before small problems turn into big downtime. The end result is that Symbia E users will experience interruption-free imaging while having the support of a network of nearly 1,000 trained field engineers.

The Symbia E offers features to accelerate the clinical workflow in acquisition, processing and reviewing with syngo workflow solutions such as an integrated physician worklist and it provides imaging in half the time for cardiology and oncology patients, when using cardio•Flash and onco•Flash reconstruction software packages. Users will realize time savings from the system’s integrated, simultaneous Quality Control component. With the Symbia E, facilities will be able to see a wide range of patients from pediatrics to bariatrics and can also be equipped with special positioning pallets for mammography. It also sports a tilting detector for optimized planar imaging.

With advanced imaging tools for oncology, cardiology, neurology and general imaging, Symbia E will truly satisfy the needs of an institution of any size, and is able to grow at the same rate as clinical requirements dictate. Symbia E is primed to be the newest general imaging SPECT and cardiac SPECT workhorse for cost- conscious customers who need a serious return on their investment. Siemens Medical Solutions of Siemens AG (NYSE: SI) is one of the world’s largest suppliers to the healthcare industry. The company is known for bringing together innovative medical technologies, healthcare information systems, management consulting, and support services, to help customers achieve tangible, sustainable, clinical and financial outcomes. Recent acquisitions in the area of in-vitro diagnostics – such as Diagnostic Products Corporation and Bayer Diagnostics – mark a significant milestone for Siemens as it becomes the first full service diagnostics company. Employing more than 41,000 people worldwide and operating in over 130 countries, Siemens Medical Solutions reported sales of 8.23 billion EUR, orders of 9.33 billion EUR and group profit of 1.06 billion EUR for fiscal 2006 (Sept. 30), according to U.S. GAAP.

Bianca Braun | Siemens AG
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/medical

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