Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Novel 3-D cell culture model shows selective tumour uptake of nanoparticles

03.09.2007
A nanoparticle drug delivery system designed for brain tumour therapy has shown promising tumour cell selectivity in a novel cell culture model devised by scientists at The University of Nottingham. The project, conducted jointly by the Schools of Pharmacy, Biomedical Sciences and Human Development, will be featured in the September issue of the Experimental Biology and Medicine.

Therapy for brain cancers is particularly difficult for a number of reasons, including getting sufficient drug to the tumour and selectivity of drug action. Dr Martin Garnett, Associate Professor of drug delivery at the School of Pharmacy said: “We are working on a number of new therapeutic approaches using nanoparticle drug delivery systems. However, understanding and developing these systems requires suitable models for their evaluation.”

The nanoparticles used in this study were prepared from a novel biodegradable polymer poly (glycerol adipate). The polymer has been further modified to enhance incorporation of drugs and make the nanoparticles more effective.

Dr Terence Parker, Associate Professor in the School of Biomedical Sciences explained: “The interaction of tumour cells with brain cells varies between different tumours and different locations within the brain. Using 3-dimensional culture models is therefore important in ensuring that the behaviour of cells in culture is similar to that seen in real life”.

The work was mainly carried out by graduate student Weina Meng who formulated the fluorescently labelled nanoparticles and studied them in a variety of tumour and brain cell cultures. Her early studies showed faster uptake of nanoparticles into tumour cell cultures than normal brain cell cultures grown separately. This selectivity was only seen in 3-dimensional cultures and was the driving force to develop a more complex and representative model.

Tumour cell aggregates have been used as cell culture models of cancer cells for many years. Similarly thin brain slices from newborn rats can be cultured for weeks and are an important tool in brain biology. In the cell co-culture model now reported, these two techniques have been brought together for the first time. Brain tumour cell aggregates were labelled with fluorescent iron microparticles and grown on normal newborn rat-brain tissue slices. The double cell labelling technique allowed investigation of tumour cell invasion into brain tissue by either fluorescence or electron microscopy from the same samples. Using these techniques the tumour aggregates were found to invade the brain slices in a similar manner to tumours in the body. Having developed the model then the tumour selective uptake of nanoparticles was demonstrated in the co-culture.

The collaboration on this project has been nurtured by Professor David Walker of the School of Human Development who co-founded the Children’s Brain Tumour Research Group at Nottingham. Professor Walker said: “Understanding the biology of tumours is important if we are to develop effective new treatments. This work demonstrates how close co-operation between disciplines can help to push forward ideas which could lead to new clinical therapies”.

Dr. Steven R. Goodman, Editor-in-Chief of Experimental Biology and Medicine, agrees with Professor Walker. Dr. Goodman stated: “The convergence of cancer cell biology and nanoscience, exemplified by this study, holds great promise for the future of brain tumour therapy.”

Emma Thorne | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Skin patch dissolves 'love handles' in mice
18.09.2017 | Columbia University Medical Center

nachricht Medicine of the future: New microchip technology could be used to track 'smart pills'
13.09.2017 | California Institute of Technology

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Molecular Force Sensors

20.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Producing electricity during flight

20.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

20.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>